Langley-Manly-Balzer Radial 5 Engine

See full size image

     

Designed by Dr. Samuel Pierpont Langley, this engine powered his unsuccessful man-carrying airplane of 1903, known as the Langley Aerodrome A.

In its original form the engine was an 8 horsepower, air-cooled rotary designed and built by Stephen M. Balzer of New York City, N.Y.

After being redesigned and rebuilt as a water-cooled fixed radial by Charles M. Manly, Langley's assistant, it became the world’s most advanced aero engine for several years.

Deposit by the Smithsonian Institution

Physical Description:
Weight (wet): 95.2 kg (209.6 lb)

Country of Origin
United States of America

Designer
Charles M. Manly
Manufacturer
Langley-Manly-Balzer
Designer
Stephen M. Balzer

Date
1903

Location
National Air and Space Museum, Washington, DC
Exhibition
Early Flight

Type
PROPULSION-Reciprocating & Rotary

Materials
Metal
Dimensions
Diameter 94.0 cm (37.0 in.), Width (Depth) 48.3 cm (19.0 in.)

Designed by Dr. Samuel Pierpont Langley, this engine powered his unsuccessful man-carrying airplane of 1903, known as the Langley Aerodrome A.

In its original form the engine was an 8 horsepower, air-cooled rotary designed and built by Stephen M. Balzer of New York City, N.Y.

After being redesigned and rebuilt as a water-cooled fixed radial by Charles M. Manly, Langley's assistant, it became the world’s most advanced aero engine for several years.

Deposit by the Smithsonian Institution

Physical Description:
Weight (wet): 95.2 kg (209.6 lb)

Country of Origin
United States of America

Designer
Charles M. Manly
Manufacturer
Langley-Manly-Balzer
Designer
Stephen M. Balzer

Date
1903

Location
National Air and Space Museum, Washington, DC
Exhibition
Early Flight

Type
PROPULSION-Reciprocating & Rotary

Materials
Metal
Dimensions
Diameter 94.0 cm (37.0 in.), Width (Depth) 48.3 cm (19.0 in.)

ID: A19080003000