Curtiss E-4, In-Line 4 Engine

This is the second of the two Curtiss engines that powered the first United States military dirigible balloon. In 1908, the U.S. Signal corps awarded Thomas Scott Baldwin a contract for the construction of an airship not to exceed 120 feet, to be completely maneuverable and to attain a speed of 20 miles per hour.

Although the airship exceeded the desired speed by 3 miles per hour, with Glenn Curtiss as engineer and Thomas Baldwin as pilot, even better performance was desired. Therefore, a more powerful and lighter engine was installed.

Gift of Charles R. Witteman.

Physical Description:
Weight: 114 kg (250 lb)

Country of Origin
United States of America

Manufacturer
Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company
Designer
Glenn H. Curtiss

Date
1908

Location
National Air and Space Museum, Washington, DC
Exhibition
Early Flight

Type
PROPULSION-Reciprocating & Rotary

Materials
metal, wood
Dimensions
Roughly 91.4 cm (3 ft) x 91.4 cm (3 ft) x 61.0 cm (2 ft), Mounted on 182.9 cm (72 in.) stand

This is the second of the two Curtiss engines that powered the first United States military dirigible balloon. In 1908, the U.S. Signal corps awarded Thomas Scott Baldwin a contract for the construction of an airship not to exceed 120 feet, to be completely maneuverable and to attain a speed of 20 miles per hour.

Although the airship exceeded the desired speed by 3 miles per hour, with Glenn Curtiss as engineer and Thomas Baldwin as pilot, even better performance was desired. Therefore, a more powerful and lighter engine was installed.

Gift of Charles R. Witteman.

Physical Description:
Weight: 114 kg (250 lb)

Country of Origin
United States of America

Manufacturer
Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company
Designer
Glenn H. Curtiss

Date
1908

Location
National Air and Space Museum, Washington, DC
Exhibition
Early Flight

Type
PROPULSION-Reciprocating & Rotary

Materials
metal, wood
Dimensions
Roughly 91.4 cm (3 ft) x 91.4 cm (3 ft) x 61.0 cm (2 ft), Mounted on 182.9 cm (72 in.) stand

ID: A19310062000