Carrier, Liquid Oxygen Flasks, R.H. Goddard

Carrier, Liquid Oxygen Flasks, R.H. Goddard

     

This carrier was used by U.S. rocket rocket experimenter Robert H. Goddard to convey Dewar flasks holding super-cold liquid oxygen (lox) for some of his earliest rocket experiments during 1923-1924. The carrier was needed since the lox was too cold to touch.

The oxygen burned with the gasoline fuel. Goddard started experimenting with solid propellant rockets in 1915, then switched to liquid propellants in 1921 because they were more powerful. He continued to experiment until his death in 1945.

This object was donated to the Smithsonian in 1959 by Mrs. Esther C. Goddard.

Gift of Mrs. Robert H. Goddard

Country of Origin
United States of America

Manufacturer
Dr. Robert H. Goddard

Date
ca. 1923-1924

Location
Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Chantilly, VA
Exhibit Station
Rockets & Missiles

Type
EQUIPMENT-Test

Materials
Wood, rope, metal nails
Overall, wood, probably pine; nails, steel; twine
Dimensions
3-D: 64.1 x 22.4 x 5.1cm (25 1/4 x 8 13/16 x 2 in.)

This carrier was used by U.S. rocket rocket experimenter Robert H. Goddard to convey Dewar flasks holding super-cold liquid oxygen (lox) for some of his earliest rocket experiments during 1923-1924. The carrier was needed since the lox was too cold to touch.

The oxygen burned with the gasoline fuel. Goddard started experimenting with solid propellant rockets in 1915, then switched to liquid propellants in 1921 because they were more powerful. He continued to experiment until his death in 1945.

This object was donated to the Smithsonian in 1959 by Mrs. Esther C. Goddard.

Gift of Mrs. Robert H. Goddard

Country of Origin
United States of America

Manufacturer
Dr. Robert H. Goddard

Date
ca. 1923-1924

Location
Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Chantilly, VA
Exhibit Station
Rockets & Missiles

Type
EQUIPMENT-Test

Materials
Wood, rope, metal nails
Overall, wood, probably pine; nails, steel; twine
Dimensions
3-D: 64.1 x 22.4 x 5.1cm (25 1/4 x 8 13/16 x 2 in.)

ID: A19590083002