Sikorsky JRS-1

This Sikorsky JRS-1 is the only aircraft in the museum collection that was stationed at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. Ten JRS-1 amphibians were at the base when the Japanese attacked, and all survived. They were immediately pressed into service and flew many missions patrolling for Japanese submarines and searching for the enemy fleet. The only armament these airplanes carried were depth charges to attack submarines.

Transferred from the United States Navy, Bureau of Weapons.

Physical Description:
Engine: 2 Pratt & Whitney R-1690 radial engines, 875hp

Country of Origin
United States of America

Manufacturer
Sikorsky Aircraft Company

Date
1938

Location
Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Chantilly, VA
Hangar
Mary Baker Engen Restoration Hangar

Type
CRAFT-Aircraft

Dimensions
Overall: 540 x 1550cm, 4816kg, 2620 x 388.62cm (17ft 8 5/8in. x 50ft 10 1/4in., 10617.4lb., 85ft 11 1/2in. x 12ft 9in.)

This Sikorsky JRS-1 is the only aircraft in the national collection that was stationed at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. Sikorsky completed the airplane, construction #4346, on July 12, 1938. The company delivered it, the thirteenth built, to the U.S. Navy on July 28. The Navy assigned the aircraft to Utility Squadron One (VJ-1) at Naval Air Station San Diego, California, on August 3, 1938. It is the sole surviving JRS-1 amphibian.

From NAS San Diego, a navy crew flew the JRS-1 to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, in July 1940, where it was assigned to Ford Island. Ten JRS-1 amphibians were at the base when the Japanese attacked. All survived. They were immediately pressed into service and flew many missions patrolling for Japanese submarines and searching for the enemy fleet. The only armament these airplanes carried were depth charges to attack submarines and were only modified to carry weapons after the December 7 attack.

The Museum's JRS-1 stopped flying these missions on September 5, 1942. The aircraft was shipped to California for a complete overhaul. Following this work, the Navy assigned it to the Commander Fleet Airship Wing 31 at Moffett Field, California, on August 21, 1943. The airplane was struck from active service August 31, 1944, with a total of 1,850 flying hours logged on the airframe. The National Air Museum officially accepted it into the collection at the Silver Hill Facility (now Paul Garber Facility) in Suitland, Maryland, on November 9, 1960. The JRS-1 remained at the Garber Facility until March 8, 2011 when it was moved to the Mary Baker Engen Restoration Hangar at the Udvar-Hazy Center near Dulles Airport.

This Sikorsky JRS-1 is the only aircraft in the museum collection that was stationed at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. Ten JRS-1 amphibians were at the base when the Japanese attacked, and all survived. They were immediately pressed into service and flew many missions patrolling for Japanese submarines and searching for the enemy fleet. The only armament these airplanes carried were depth charges to attack submarines.

Transferred from the United States Navy, Bureau of Weapons.

Physical Description:
Engine: 2 Pratt & Whitney R-1690 radial engines, 875hp

Country of Origin
United States of America

Manufacturer
Sikorsky Aircraft Company

Date
1938

Location
Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Chantilly, VA
Hangar
Mary Baker Engen Restoration Hangar

Type
CRAFT-Aircraft

Dimensions
Overall: 540 x 1550cm, 4816kg, 2620 x 388.62cm (17ft 8 5/8in. x 50ft 10 1/4in., 10617.4lb., 85ft 11 1/2in. x 12ft 9in.)

This Sikorsky JRS-1 is the only aircraft in the national collection that was stationed at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. Sikorsky completed the airplane, construction #4346, on July 12, 1938. The company delivered it, the thirteenth built, to the U.S. Navy on July 28. The Navy assigned the aircraft to Utility Squadron One (VJ-1) at Naval Air Station San Diego, California, on August 3, 1938. It is the sole surviving JRS-1 amphibian.

From NAS San Diego, a navy crew flew the JRS-1 to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, in July 1940, where it was assigned to Ford Island. Ten JRS-1 amphibians were at the base when the Japanese attacked. All survived. They were immediately pressed into service and flew many missions patrolling for Japanese submarines and searching for the enemy fleet. The only armament these airplanes carried were depth charges to attack submarines and were only modified to carry weapons after the December 7 attack.

The Museum's JRS-1 stopped flying these missions on September 5, 1942. The aircraft was shipped to California for a complete overhaul. Following this work, the Navy assigned it to the Commander Fleet Airship Wing 31 at Moffett Field, California, on August 21, 1943. The airplane was struck from active service August 31, 1944, with a total of 1,850 flying hours logged on the airframe. The National Air Museum officially accepted it into the collection at the Silver Hill Facility (now Paul Garber Facility) in Suitland, Maryland, on November 9, 1960. The JRS-1 remained at the Garber Facility until March 8, 2011 when it was moved to the Mary Baker Engen Restoration Hangar at the Udvar-Hazy Center near Dulles Airport.

ID: A19610112000