Capsule, Mercury #15B

This Mercury capsule, number 15B, is one of two left showing the complete one-man spacecraft in its orbital configuration. It includes the silver and black retrorocket package used to slow the capsule for return to Earth and the nose section containing the parachutes. The first American in space, Alan B. Shepard, Jr., hoped to fly this Mercury capsule on a long-duration orbital mission in late 1963 called Mercury-Atlas 10 (MA-10). After the success of MA-9, flown by astronaut Gordon Cooper in May 1963, NASA decided to cancel MA-10 to concentrate on its next human spaceflight project, Gemini. Reflecting Shepard's hope of flying in space again, he had the name Freedom 7 II, in tribute to his historic 1961 capsule, Freedom 7, painted on the spacecraft.

In September 1967 NASA transferred the capsule to the Smithsonian Institution.

Transferred from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Country of Origin
United States of America

Manufacturer
McDonnell Aircraft Corp.

Location
Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Chantilly, VA
Exhibit Station
Human Spaceflight

Type
SPACECRAFT-Manned

Materials
Skin & Structure: Titanium
Shingles: Nickel-steel alloy; Berylium shingles removed
Ablation Shield: Glass fibers, resin
Dimensions
Overall: 74 in. diameter, 3000lb., 11 ft. 4 in. length (188cm, 1360.8kg, 345.4cm)

This Mercury capsule, number 15B, is the one of only two left showing the complete one-man spacecraft in its orbital configuration. It includes the silver and black retrorocket package used to slow the capsule for return to Earth, and the nose section containing the parachutes. The first American in space, Alan B. Shepard, Jr., hoped to fly this Mercury capsule on a long-duration orbital mission in late 1963 called Mercury-Atlas 10 (MA-10). After the success of MA-9, flown by astronaut Gordon Cooper in May 1963, NASA decided to cancel MA-10 to concentrate on its next human spaceflight project, Gemini. Reflecting Shepard's hope of flying in space again, he had the name Freedom 7 II, in tribute to his historic 1961 capsule, Freedom 7, painted on the spacecraft.

Mercury capsule 15 originally was sent to Cape Canaveral in 1961 for a manned suborbital mission, Mercury-Redstone 5 (MR-5) that was cancelled. It was then modified for an orbital mission and renumbered 15A, and then modified again as a backup to the MA-9 spacecraft, #20, and as the prime spacecraft for MA-10, and dubbed 15B. In September 1967 NASA transferred the capsule to the Smithsonian Institution.

This Mercury capsule, number 15B, is one of two left showing the complete one-man spacecraft in its orbital configuration. It includes the silver and black retrorocket package used to slow the capsule for return to Earth and the nose section containing the parachutes. The first American in space, Alan B. Shepard, Jr., hoped to fly this Mercury capsule on a long-duration orbital mission in late 1963 called Mercury-Atlas 10 (MA-10). After the success of MA-9, flown by astronaut Gordon Cooper in May 1963, NASA decided to cancel MA-10 to concentrate on its next human spaceflight project, Gemini. Reflecting Shepard's hope of flying in space again, he had the name Freedom 7 II, in tribute to his historic 1961 capsule, Freedom 7, painted on the spacecraft.

In September 1967 NASA transferred the capsule to the Smithsonian Institution.

Transferred from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Country of Origin
United States of America

Manufacturer
McDonnell Aircraft Corp.

Location
Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Chantilly, VA
Exhibit Station
Human Spaceflight

Type
SPACECRAFT-Manned

Materials
Skin & Structure: Titanium
Shingles: Nickel-steel alloy; Berylium shingles removed
Ablation Shield: Glass fibers, resin
Dimensions
Overall: 74 in. diameter, 3000lb., 11 ft. 4 in. length (188cm, 1360.8kg, 345.4cm)

This Mercury capsule, number 15B, is the one of only two left showing the complete one-man spacecraft in its orbital configuration. It includes the silver and black retrorocket package used to slow the capsule for return to Earth, and the nose section containing the parachutes. The first American in space, Alan B. Shepard, Jr., hoped to fly this Mercury capsule on a long-duration orbital mission in late 1963 called Mercury-Atlas 10 (MA-10). After the success of MA-9, flown by astronaut Gordon Cooper in May 1963, NASA decided to cancel MA-10 to concentrate on its next human spaceflight project, Gemini. Reflecting Shepard's hope of flying in space again, he had the name Freedom 7 II, in tribute to his historic 1961 capsule, Freedom 7, painted on the spacecraft.

Mercury capsule 15 originally was sent to Cape Canaveral in 1961 for a manned suborbital mission, Mercury-Redstone 5 (MR-5) that was cancelled. It was then modified for an orbital mission and renumbered 15A, and then modified again as a backup to the MA-9 spacecraft, #20, and as the prime spacecraft for MA-10, and dubbed 15B. In September 1967 NASA transferred the capsule to the Smithsonian Institution.

ID: A19680241000