Head, Golf Club, Apollo 14, Replica

This is a replica of the makeshift golf club that NASA astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr. used to hit two golf balls on the Moon during Apollo 14 in February 1971. Shepard carried the modified Wilson six-iron in his spacesuit pocket, afixing the club head to the handle of a contingency sample return device. After the flight, Shepard gave the original club head to the US Golf Association Hall of Fame in New Jersey and this replica to the National Collection in 1975.

Gift of Alan B. Shepard Jr.

Country of Origin
United States of America

Manufacturer
Marathon Construction Company

Type
PERSONAL EQUIPMENT-Miscellaneous

Materials
Aluminum
Steel
Plastic
Velcro
Adhesive
Synthetic Fabric
Rubber
Paint
Copper Alloy
Dimensions
Approximate: 106 x 8.9 x 3.8cm (41 3/4 x 3 1/2 x 1 1/2 in.)

135:08:17 Shepard: (Facing the TV) Houston, while you're looking that up, you might recognize what I have in my hand as the handle for the contingency sample return; it just so happens to have a genuine six iron on the bottom of it. In my left hand, I have a little white pellet that's familiar to millions of Americans. I'll drop it down. Unfortunately, the suit is so stiff, I can't do this with two hands, but I'm going to try a little sand-trap shot here. (Pause)

[Jones - "He topped and buried it on the first swing. I assume that the six-iron was snuck on board."]

[Mitchell - "In his suit pocket."]

[The suits each had a utility pocket on the left thigh. During the EVA, Al and Ed wore a larger, strap-on pocket on the left thigh,

135:08:53 Mitchell: You got more dirt than ball that time.

135:08:58 Shepard: Got more dirt than ball. Here we go again.

[Al's second swing pushes the ball about 2 or 3 feet, mostly along the line toward the TV camera, rather than along the line of the swing.]

135:09:01 Haise: That looked like a slice to me, Al.

135:09:03 Shepard: Here we go. Straight as a die; one more. (Long Pause)

[Al's third swing finally connects and sends the ball off-camera to the right, apparently on a fairly low trajectory. He drops a second ball, which rolls left and toward the TV camera. Al gets himself in position and connects again. The trajectory of this shot appears to be similar to the previous one.]

135:09:20 Shepard: Miles and miles and miles.

135:09:26 Haise: Very good, Al.

[With regard to Al's "miles and miles and miles", see the discussion following 135:21:50.]

[Readers should note that, while the golf-shot picture in Al's book Moonshot bears some resemblance to the TV images, it is actually a composite made up of pieces of various Hasselblad images. The only actual record of the golf shot is the TV coverage. Al and Ed had already put their Hasselblads into the ETB at about 135:06:06.]

[Not long after I bought a copy of Moonshot, Andrew Chaikin and I had a long telephone conversation about the composite and worked out - at least in general terms - how it was put together. Journal Contributor David Harland tells us that the 1994 hardback UK edition published by Virgin Books contains the composite, while Brian Lawrence tells us that the 1995 edition does not.]

[In the composite, the LM and LM shadow come from a left/right reversal of AS14-66 9276. Note the LRRR which is sitting in the footpad of the ladder strut. In reality, the LR-Cubed was deployed at the ALSEP site during the first EVA. Both of the astronaut images in the composite come from a pan Al took at the beginning of EVA-1 shortly before 114:53:34. The image of "Al" is actually a left/right reversal of Ed's image from AS14-66- 9240. In the real photograph, Ed is doing a TV pan. In the composite, the TV camera has been removed and the golf club has been added. The image of "Ed" in the composite is taken from another frame in Al's earlier pan, AS14-66- 9241. And, once again, the TV had been removed from a left-right reversal of the original images. Similarly, the image of the U.S. flag has been taken from AS14-66- 9232- or one of the other tourist pictures Al and Ed took during the flag deployment. I have not yet identified the precise images from which the MET and the S-Band were taken; but, the MET image is very similar to the one in AS14-67- 9361, which Al took at the ALSEP site at the end of the ALSEP deployment. Finally, the ball and the shadows of the S-Band legs - like the golf club - appear to have been drawn in.]

135:09:27 Haise: And (to) answer Ed's question earlier there; Kilo-Kilo was used for the window shots, Ed; so, you ought to bring it back.

RealVideo Clip (3 min 36 sec)

135:09:43 Shepard: Yeah, that's right. We got some of that to start with, didn't we?

135:09:46 Mitchell: Yeah.

135:09:49 Shepard: (Garbled). (Long Pause)

[Al removes the club head. He brought it home and it is currently on display at the US Golf Association Hall of Fame in New Jersey.]

This is a replica of the makeshift golf club that NASA astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr. used to hit two golf balls on the Moon during Apollo 14 in February 1971. Shepard carried the modified Wilson six-iron in his spacesuit pocket, afixing the club head to the handle of a contingency sample return device. After the flight, Shepard gave the original club head to the US Golf Association Hall of Fame in New Jersey and this replica to the National Collection in 1975.

Gift of Alan B. Shepard Jr.

Country of Origin
United States of America

Manufacturer
Marathon Construction Company

Type
PERSONAL EQUIPMENT-Miscellaneous

Materials
Aluminum
Steel
Plastic
Velcro
Adhesive
Synthetic Fabric
Rubber
Paint
Copper Alloy
Dimensions
Approximate: 106 x 8.9 x 3.8cm (41 3/4 x 3 1/2 x 1 1/2 in.)

135:08:17 Shepard: (Facing the TV) Houston, while you're looking that up, you might recognize what I have in my hand as the handle for the contingency sample return; it just so happens to have a genuine six iron on the bottom of it. In my left hand, I have a little white pellet that's familiar to millions of Americans. I'll drop it down. Unfortunately, the suit is so stiff, I can't do this with two hands, but I'm going to try a little sand-trap shot here. (Pause)

[Jones - "He topped and buried it on the first swing. I assume that the six-iron was snuck on board."]

[Mitchell - "In his suit pocket."]

[The suits each had a utility pocket on the left thigh. During the EVA, Al and Ed wore a larger, strap-on pocket on the left thigh,

135:08:53 Mitchell: You got more dirt than ball that time.

135:08:58 Shepard: Got more dirt than ball. Here we go again.

[Al's second swing pushes the ball about 2 or 3 feet, mostly along the line toward the TV camera, rather than along the line of the swing.]

135:09:01 Haise: That looked like a slice to me, Al.

135:09:03 Shepard: Here we go. Straight as a die; one more. (Long Pause)

[Al's third swing finally connects and sends the ball off-camera to the right, apparently on a fairly low trajectory. He drops a second ball, which rolls left and toward the TV camera. Al gets himself in position and connects again. The trajectory of this shot appears to be similar to the previous one.]

135:09:20 Shepard: Miles and miles and miles.

135:09:26 Haise: Very good, Al.

[With regard to Al's "miles and miles and miles", see the discussion following 135:21:50.]

[Readers should note that, while the golf-shot picture in Al's book Moonshot bears some resemblance to the TV images, it is actually a composite made up of pieces of various Hasselblad images. The only actual record of the golf shot is the TV coverage. Al and Ed had already put their Hasselblads into the ETB at about 135:06:06.]

[Not long after I bought a copy of Moonshot, Andrew Chaikin and I had a long telephone conversation about the composite and worked out - at least in general terms - how it was put together. Journal Contributor David Harland tells us that the 1994 hardback UK edition published by Virgin Books contains the composite, while Brian Lawrence tells us that the 1995 edition does not.]

[In the composite, the LM and LM shadow come from a left/right reversal of AS14-66 9276. Note the LRRR which is sitting in the footpad of the ladder strut. In reality, the LR-Cubed was deployed at the ALSEP site during the first EVA. Both of the astronaut images in the composite come from a pan Al took at the beginning of EVA-1 shortly before 114:53:34. The image of "Al" is actually a left/right reversal of Ed's image from AS14-66- 9240. In the real photograph, Ed is doing a TV pan. In the composite, the TV camera has been removed and the golf club has been added. The image of "Ed" in the composite is taken from another frame in Al's earlier pan, AS14-66- 9241. And, once again, the TV had been removed from a left-right reversal of the original images. Similarly, the image of the U.S. flag has been taken from AS14-66- 9232- or one of the other tourist pictures Al and Ed took during the flag deployment. I have not yet identified the precise images from which the MET and the S-Band were taken; but, the MET image is very similar to the one in AS14-67- 9361, which Al took at the ALSEP site at the end of the ALSEP deployment. Finally, the ball and the shadows of the S-Band legs - like the golf club - appear to have been drawn in.]

135:09:27 Haise: And (to) answer Ed's question earlier there; Kilo-Kilo was used for the window shots, Ed; so, you ought to bring it back.

RealVideo Clip (3 min 36 sec)

135:09:43 Shepard: Yeah, that's right. We got some of that to start with, didn't we?

135:09:46 Mitchell: Yeah.

135:09:49 Shepard: (Garbled). (Long Pause)

[Al removes the club head. He brought it home and it is currently on display at the US Golf Association Hall of Fame in New Jersey.]

ID: A19751468000