Williams WR19 Turbofan Engine

Sam Williams believed that gas-turbine technology could be extended down to very small sizes, and his 311 N (70 lb) thrust WR2 turbojet first ran in 1962. Using the same core, the WR19 first ran in 1967, and was the world's smallest turbofan engine at that time. In April 1969, Robert Courter, a Bell test pilot, made the first free flight of the WR19-powered Jet Flying Belt unit strapped on his back. This artifact is the Serial Number 3 WR19 engine.

In the early-1980s, the first Air-Launched Cruise Missiles (ALCM), as well as sea and ground launched equivalents, became operational, all powered by the F107 turbofan, an uprated version of the WR19.

Williams received the 1978 Collier Trophy for the "...design and development of the world's smallest, high efficiency fanjet engine. The ingenious design resulted in a unique, lightweight, low cost and efficient engine which was one of the keys in proving the cruise missile concept."

Gift of Williams Research Corporation, Walled Lake, Michigan

Physical Description:
Weight: 30 kg (67 lb)

Country of Origin
United States of America

Designer
Sam Williams
Manufacturer
Williams-Rolls, Inc., Ogden, Utah

Date
1969

Location
National Air and Space Museum, Washington, DC
Exhibition
Jet Aviation

Type
PROPULSION-Turbines (Jet)

Dimensions
Length 61 cm (24.0 in.), Diameter 30.5 cm (12.0 in.)

Sam Williams believed that gas-turbine technology could be extended down to very small sizes, and his 311 N (70 lb) thrust WR2 turbojet first ran in 1962. Using the same core, the WR19 first ran in 1967, and was the world's smallest turbofan engine at that time. In April 1969, Robert Courter, a Bell test pilot, made the first free flight of the WR19-powered Jet Flying Belt unit strapped on his back. This artifact is the Serial Number 3 WR19 engine.

In the early-1980s, the first Air-Launched Cruise Missiles (ALCM), as well as sea and ground launched equivalents, became operational, all powered by the F107 turbofan, an uprated version of the WR19.

Williams received the 1978 Collier Trophy for the "...design and development of the world's smallest, high efficiency fanjet engine. The ingenious design resulted in a unique, lightweight, low cost and efficient engine which was one of the keys in proving the cruise missile concept."

Gift of Williams Research Corporation, Walled Lake, Michigan

Physical Description:
Weight: 30 kg (67 lb)

Country of Origin
United States of America

Designer
Sam Williams
Manufacturer
Williams-Rolls, Inc., Ogden, Utah

Date
1969

Location
National Air and Space Museum, Washington, DC
Exhibition
Jet Aviation

Type
PROPULSION-Turbines (Jet)

Dimensions
Length 61 cm (24.0 in.), Diameter 30.5 cm (12.0 in.)

ID: A19790109000