Heinkel (von Ohain) HeS 3B Turbojet Engine, Reproduction

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On Aug. 27, 1939, the HeS 3B powered the Heinkel He 178 on the world's first flight of a turbojet powered aircraft.

The Heinkel HeS 3B engine was designed by the German pioneer, Dr. Hans von Ohain, for Dr. Ernst Heinkel, who in April 1936, had given him the full backing of his airplane company.

Dr. von Ohain immediately began the development of a simple jet engine which would demonstrate the jet principle convincingly. This test engine, called the HeS 1, was tested successfully on the ground during March and April1937, using gaseous hydrogen as fuel.

An accelerated flight engine program followed, with emphasis on combustor development. The HeS 3B engine, which evolved in 1938, was similar to Sir Frank Whittle’s engine in that it used a centrifugal flow compressor. However, it used internal fuel gasification initially rather than the desired atomized liquid fuel injection system, used in later versions.

The engine exhibited is a non-working reproduction built by the German Engine Industry under the leadership of the M.T.U. Co., Munich at the request of the Deutches Museum of Munich, Germany, from plans drawn by Dr. von Ohain.

Gift of Motoren- und Turbinen-Union Company, Munich, Germany

Physical Description:
Weight: 360 kg (794 lb)

Country of Origin
Germany

Designer
Dr. Hans von Ohain
Manufacturer
Heinkel-Hirth (Hirth-Motorenwerke), Stuttgart, Germany
Motoren- und Turbinen-Union Munchen GmbH

Date
1938

Location
National Air and Space Museum, Washington, DC
Exhibition
Jet Aviation

Type
PROPULSION-Turbines (Jet)

Materials
Metal, Wood, Plexiglas
Dimensions
Length 128.9 cm (50.75 in.), Width 116.8 cm (46.0 in.), Height 106.0 cm (41.75 in.)

On Aug. 27, 1939, the HeS 3B powered the Heinkel He 178 on the world's first flight of a turbojet powered aircraft.

The Heinkel HeS 3B engine was designed by the German pioneer, Dr. Hans von Ohain, for Dr. Ernst Heinkel, who in April 1936, had given him the full backing of his airplane company.

Dr. von Ohain immediately began the development of a simple jet engine which would demonstrate the jet principle convincingly. This test engine, called the HeS 1, was tested successfully on the ground during March and April1937, using gaseous hydrogen as fuel.

An accelerated flight engine program followed, with emphasis on combustor development. The HeS 3B engine, which evolved in 1938, was similar to Sir Frank Whittle’s engine in that it used a centrifugal flow compressor. However, it used internal fuel gasification initially rather than the desired atomized liquid fuel injection system, used in later versions.

The engine exhibited is a non-working reproduction built by the German Engine Industry under the leadership of the M.T.U. Co., Munich at the request of the Deutches Museum of Munich, Germany, from plans drawn by Dr. von Ohain.

Gift of Motoren- und Turbinen-Union Company, Munich, Germany

Physical Description:
Weight: 360 kg (794 lb)

Country of Origin
Germany

Designer
Dr. Hans von Ohain
Manufacturer
Heinkel-Hirth (Hirth-Motorenwerke), Stuttgart, Germany
Motoren- und Turbinen-Union Munchen GmbH

Date
1938

Location
National Air and Space Museum, Washington, DC
Exhibition
Jet Aviation

Type
PROPULSION-Turbines (Jet)

Materials
Metal, Wood, Plexiglas
Dimensions
Length 128.9 cm (50.75 in.), Width 116.8 cm (46.0 in.), Height 106.0 cm (41.75 in.)

ID: A19810039000