Pratt & Whitney J57-P-29W Turbojet Engine, Cutaway

The production engine was the first to reach and exceed 10,000 pounds (4535 kilograms) of static thrust; as a result, the North American F-100 became the first mass-produced fighter to reach supersonic speed in level flight.

It powered several other military airplanes, including the McDonnell F-101, Convair F-102, Douglas A3D and F4D, Chance Vought F8U, and Boeing B-52 and KC-135. It also powered the Boeing 707 and 720, and Douglas DC-8 commercial airplanes.

In 1953, the Collier Trophy, U.S. highest aviation honor, was awarded to Leonard Hobbs, Chief Engineer of Pratt & Whitney Division of United Aircraft Corp. for his development work on this engine.

During the 15 years that this engine was produced – until 1965 – more than 20,000 were manufactured for civilian (JT3), and military (J57) use.

Gift of Pratt & Whitney Aircraft, Division of United Technologies Corporation

Physical Description:
Weight (dry): 1,945 kg (4,285 lb)

Country of Origin
United States of America

Designer
George Willgoos
Perry W. Pratt
Manufacturer
Pratt & Whitney

Date
Circa 1950-1965

Location
National Air and Space Museum, Washington, DC
Exhibition
Jet Aviation

Type
PROPULSION-Turbines (Jet)

Materials
Metal, plastic
Dimensions
Length 400.1 cm (157.5 in.), Diameter 102.9 cm (40.5 in.)

The production engine was the first to reach and exceed 10,000 pounds (4535 kilograms) of static thrust; as a result, the North American F-100 became the first mass-produced fighter to reach supersonic speed in level flight.

It powered several other military airplanes, including the McDonnell F-101, Convair F-102, Douglas A3D and F4D, Chance Vought F8U, and Boeing B-52 and KC-135. It also powered the Boeing 707 and 720, and Douglas DC-8 commercial airplanes.

In 1953, the Collier Trophy, U.S. highest aviation honor, was awarded to Leonard Hobbs, Chief Engineer of Pratt & Whitney Division of United Aircraft Corp. for his development work on this engine.

During the 15 years that this engine was produced – until 1965 – more than 20,000 were manufactured for civilian (JT3), and military (J57) use.

Gift of Pratt & Whitney Aircraft, Division of United Technologies Corporation

Physical Description:
Weight (dry): 1,945 kg (4,285 lb)

Country of Origin
United States of America

Designer
George Willgoos
Perry W. Pratt
Manufacturer
Pratt & Whitney

Date
Circa 1950-1965

Location
National Air and Space Museum, Washington, DC
Exhibition
Jet Aviation

Type
PROPULSION-Turbines (Jet)

Materials
Metal, plastic
Dimensions
Length 400.1 cm (157.5 in.), Diameter 102.9 cm (40.5 in.)

ID: A19810155000