Injector Head, Rocket Engine, R.H. Goddard, Ca. 1929-1930

This is an injector head for a liquid fuel rocket static tested by American rocket pioneer Dr. Robert H. Goddard from December 1929 to February 1930 at Fort Devens, Massachusetts. Injectors are used to force in the liquid rocket propellant into the motor's combustion chamber for burning in order to drive the rocket forward. Goddard called it the "Dent-Type Injector" because it had conical dents, or depressions, in the square nickel tubes. It also featured a ceramic coating over its facing to absorb heat during the firing of the motor. As a result of the tests, Goddard concluded that the injector was too weak and discarded this design as unsuitable. No flights were attempted at Fort Devens and only static tests were made.

Thee Daniel and Florence Guggenheim Foundation donated this injector to the Smithsonian in 1950.

Gift of the Daniel & Florence Guggenheim Foundation.

Country of Origin
United States of America

Manufacturer
Dr. Robert H. Goddard

Date
December 1929 - March 1930

Type
PROPULSION-Components (Engine Parts)

Materials
Steel pyramid and steel overall; ceramic, then called Insalute cement, coated over injector holes underneath; probably "flake asbestos" inside the frustrum (pyramid) hollow, according to original Goddard notes, Vol. III, p. IX-20, cited below in Documentation.
Dimensions
Overall: 9 1/2 in. long x 7 in. diameter (24.13 x 17.78cm)

This is an injector head for a liquid fuel rocket static tested by American rocket pioneer Dr. Robert H. Goddard from December 1929 to February 1930 at Fort Devens, Massachusetts. Injectors are used to force in the liquid rocket propellant into the motor's combustion chamber for burning in order to drive the rocket forward. Goddard called it the "Dent-Type Injector" because it had conical dents, or depressions, in the square nickel tubes. It also featured a ceramic coating over its facing to absorb heat during the firing of the motor. As a result of the tests, Goddard concluded that the injector was too weak and discarded this design as unsuitable. No flights were attempted at Fort Devens and only static tests were made.

Thee Daniel and Florence Guggenheim Foundation donated this injector to the Smithsonian in 1950.

Gift of the Daniel & Florence Guggenheim Foundation.

Country of Origin
United States of America

Manufacturer
Dr. Robert H. Goddard

Date
December 1929 - March 1930

Type
PROPULSION-Components (Engine Parts)

Materials
Steel pyramid and steel overall; ceramic, then called Insalute cement, coated over injector holes underneath; probably "flake asbestos" inside the frustrum (pyramid) hollow, according to original Goddard notes, Vol. III, p. IX-20, cited below in Documentation.
Dimensions
Overall: 9 1/2 in. long x 7 in. diameter (24.13 x 17.78cm)

ID: A19850184000