Drone, RP-76

Drone, RP-76

     

This is the RP-76, rocket-powered, recoverable target drone, also designated AQM-38A. Developed by the Radioplane Division of Northrop Aircraft from the 1950's, the RP-76 was a training aid for U.S. Army crews manning Nike-Ajax and Hawk anti-aircraft missiles. The RP-76 gave the appearance of a large bomber aircraft and performed realistic maneuvers at high and low levels.

It was capable of speeds up to Mach 0.9 up to 70-75,000 feet. The RP-76 was radio controlled and could be recovered by parachute. The RP-76 was powered by a slow-burning solid-propellant Aerojet-General Corp. 530NS-35 motor of 35 pounds of thrust for 530 seconds.

The Army transferred the RP-76 to the Smithsonian in 1991.

Trasnferred from U.S. Army

Country of Origin
United States of America

Manufacturer
Radioplane Div., Northrop Corporation

Type
CRAFT-Missiles & Rockets

Materials
Nose, non-ferrous metal or possibly plastic; middle or motor section, steel; rear, including tail, main fins, and rear fins, non-ferrous or possibly plastic; forward stabilizers, two, steel; nozzles, two, steel, with some minor rust spots; cowling over motors, on both sides of fuselage, plastic; rear cone, plastic, tip broken; black inserts around each nozzle, possibly plastic; lugs on top of fuselage, two, steel
Dimensions
Approximate: 12 in. diameter (30.5cm)
Other: 9 ft. 9 in. long x 4 ft. 11 in. span, 120 lb. (297.2 x 149.9cm, 54.4kg)

This is the RP-76, rocket-powered, recoverable target drone, also designated AQM-38A. Developed by the Radioplane Division of Northrop Aircraft from the 1950's, the RP-76 was a training aid for U.S. Army crews manning Nike-Ajax and Hawk anti-aircraft missiles. The RP-76 gave the appearance of a large bomber aircraft and performed realistic maneuvers at high and low levels.

It was capable of speeds up to Mach 0.9 up to 70-75,000 feet. The RP-76 was radio controlled and could be recovered by parachute. The RP-76 was powered by a slow-burning solid-propellant Aerojet-General Corp. 530NS-35 motor of 35 pounds of thrust for 530 seconds.

The Army transferred the RP-76 to the Smithsonian in 1991.

Trasnferred from U.S. Army

Country of Origin
United States of America

Manufacturer
Radioplane Div., Northrop Corporation

Type
CRAFT-Missiles & Rockets

Materials
Nose, non-ferrous metal or possibly plastic; middle or motor section, steel; rear, including tail, main fins, and rear fins, non-ferrous or possibly plastic; forward stabilizers, two, steel; nozzles, two, steel, with some minor rust spots; cowling over motors, on both sides of fuselage, plastic; rear cone, plastic, tip broken; black inserts around each nozzle, possibly plastic; lugs on top of fuselage, two, steel
Dimensions
Approximate: 12 in. diameter (30.5cm)
Other: 9 ft. 9 in. long x 4 ft. 11 in. span, 120 lb. (297.2 x 149.9cm, 54.4kg)

ID: A19910077000