Rocket, Solid Fuel, Loki

Rocket, Solid Fuel, Loki

     

The Loki was based on the Taifun anti-aircraft liquid-fuel German rocket of World War II but used solid-fuels. It was originally designed as a barrage weapon by the U.S. Army in 1949 and was developed by the Bendix Corporation. The Grand Central Aircraft Corporation was responsible for its propulsion.

The rocket is small and light but very powerful for its size, using a cast solid-propellant and producing about 2,200 pounds of thrust for 1.7 seconds. It was also very inexpensive and cost about $ 250. The Loki was therefore readily adapted, with modifications by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the State University of Iowa, for upper atmospheric sounding work in which the Loki usually served as the second stage and carried a very light payload. Lokis have also been fired from balloons to boost their altitudes. They were especially used during the International Geophysical Year (1957-1958).

The U.S. Army transferred this Loki to the Museum in 1990.

Transferred from U.S. Army Center of Military History

Country of Origin
United States of America

Manufacturer
Bendix Aviation Corp.

Date
1954

Type
CRAFT-Missiles & Rockets

Materials
metal
Dimensions
Other: 3 1/2in. x 9ft 7 3/16in., 45lb. (8.9 x 292.6cm, 20.4kg)
Other (Fin span): 13.97cm (5 1/2in.)

The Loki was based on the Taifun anti-aircraft liquid-fuel German rocket of World War II but used solid-fuels. It was originally designed as a barrage weapon by the U.S. Army in 1949 and was developed by the Bendix Corporation. The Grand Central Aircraft Corporation was responsible for its propulsion.

The rocket is small and light but very powerful for its size, using a cast solid-propellant and producing about 2,200 pounds of thrust for 1.7 seconds. It was also very inexpensive and cost about $ 250. The Loki was therefore readily adapted, with modifications by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the State University of Iowa, for upper atmospheric sounding work in which the Loki usually served as the second stage and carried a very light payload. Lokis have also been fired from balloons to boost their altitudes. They were especially used during the International Geophysical Year (1957-1958).

The U.S. Army transferred this Loki to the Museum in 1990.

Transferred from U.S. Army Center of Military History

Country of Origin
United States of America

Manufacturer
Bendix Aviation Corp.

Date
1954

Type
CRAFT-Missiles & Rockets

Materials
metal
Dimensions
Other: 3 1/2in. x 9ft 7 3/16in., 45lb. (8.9 x 292.6cm, 20.4kg)
Other (Fin span): 13.97cm (5 1/2in.)

ID: A19910079000