Astronavigator, Binocular Viewer, Prototype

This device was proposed to NASA as an emergency system, which would help astronauts navigate through space in the event of a malfunction of the primary navigation system. The device used a plastic globe, a set of lights, and a special lens, called "Foster's Eye," to allow astronauts to get a fix on their position. NASA chose not to install a mechanical backup of this type on Apollo, although it is worth noting that the Soviet space program used a device similar to this one for its Soyuz capsules.

Edwin Collen, its inventor, gave this device to the Museum.

Gift of Edwin G. Collen

Country of Origin
United States of America

Designer
Edwin G. Collen
Manufacturer
Edwin G. Collen

Location
National Air and Space Museum, Washington, DC
Exhibition
Time and Navigation

Type
INSTRUMENTS-Scientific

Materials
Wood, Plastic, Nylon, Aluminum, Paper, Glass, Rubber (Silicone), Paint
Dimensions
3-D: 33 x 43.2 x 33cm (13 x 17 x 13 in.)

This device was proposed to NASA as an emergency system, which would help astronauts navigate through space in the event of a malfunction of the primary navigation system. The device used a plastic globe, a set of lights, and a special lens, called "Foster's Eye," to allow astronauts to get a fix on their position. NASA chose not to install a mechanical backup of this type on Apollo, although it is worth noting that the Soviet space program used a device similar to this one for its Soyuz capsules.

Edwin Collen, its inventor, gave this device to the Museum.

Gift of Edwin G. Collen

Country of Origin
United States of America

Designer
Edwin G. Collen
Manufacturer
Edwin G. Collen

Location
National Air and Space Museum, Washington, DC
Exhibition
Time and Navigation

Type
INSTRUMENTS-Scientific

Materials
Wood, Plastic, Nylon, Aluminum, Paper, Glass, Rubber (Silicone), Paint
Dimensions
3-D: 33 x 43.2 x 33cm (13 x 17 x 13 in.)

ID: A19930078000