Continental C-125-2 Horizontally-opposed Engine

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Detroit’s Continental Motors was the world’s largest manufacturer of automotive engines during the 1920s. In 1925, it bought patent rights to the Burt McCollum mono-sleeve valve, but could not successfully apply it in an aircraft engine. Returning to poppet valves, the A-70 radial of 1928 was the company’s successful contribution to the post-World War I aircraft engine market. However, Continental only became an industry leader with the horizontally opposed type; the first being the A-40 of 1931.

Installed in the Piper J-3 cub airframe, a 1939 refined version of Continental’s A-65 horizontally opposed engine promoted great growth of sport aviation by providing a dependable, inexpensive airplane with adequate performance and sufficient production to support good service facilities at almost any airport.

Introduced following World War II with a series of larger horizontally opposed engines, the C-125 was in production from 1945 to 1952. This C-125 artifact powered a Globe Swift GC-1B small general aviation aircraft.

Gift of Michael H. Bednarek, Swift Museum Foundation, Inc., G. Porter Houston, and Robert H. Padgett

Physical Description:
Weight (dry): 116.6 kg (257 lb)

Country of Origin
United States of America

Manufacturer
Continental, Inc.

Date
1946

Location
National Air and Space Museum, Washington, DC
Exhibition
How Things Fly

Type
PROPULSION-Reciprocating & Rotary

Materials
Metal
Dimensions
Length 101.3 cm (39.875 in.), Width 80 cm (31.5 in.), Height 67.9 cm (26.75 in.)

Detroit’s Continental Motors was the world’s largest manufacturer of automotive engines during the 1920s. In 1925, it bought patent rights to the Burt McCollum mono-sleeve valve, but could not successfully apply it in an aircraft engine. Returning to poppet valves, the A-70 radial of 1928 was the company’s successful contribution to the post-World War I aircraft engine market. However, Continental only became an industry leader with the horizontally opposed type; the first being the A-40 of 1931.

Installed in the Piper J-3 cub airframe, a 1939 refined version of Continental’s A-65 horizontally opposed engine promoted great growth of sport aviation by providing a dependable, inexpensive airplane with adequate performance and sufficient production to support good service facilities at almost any airport.

Introduced following World War II with a series of larger horizontally opposed engines, the C-125 was in production from 1945 to 1952. This C-125 artifact powered a Globe Swift GC-1B small general aviation aircraft.

Gift of Michael H. Bednarek, Swift Museum Foundation, Inc., G. Porter Houston, and Robert H. Padgett

Physical Description:
Weight (dry): 116.6 kg (257 lb)

Country of Origin
United States of America

Manufacturer
Continental, Inc.

Date
1946

Location
National Air and Space Museum, Washington, DC
Exhibition
How Things Fly

Type
PROPULSION-Reciprocating & Rotary

Materials
Metal
Dimensions
Length 101.3 cm (39.875 in.), Width 80 cm (31.5 in.), Height 67.9 cm (26.75 in.)

ID: A19930085000