Pressure Suit, AX-2

The AX-2 was designed at NASA Ames Research Center in the mid-1960s by "Vic" Vykukal. A lunar prototype suit designed to operate at 5 pounds per square inch, it has "stovepipe" mobility joints, metal bellows, and a bearing at the waist. Sealed bearings between the stovepipe joints allowed each element to rotate. Although the suit functioned as intended, NASA chose the "soft" suit for use on the lunar surface, and this suit was the last of its type.

Transferred to NASM from NASA - Ames Research Center in 2004.

Transferred from NASA, Ames Research Center.

Country of Origin
United States of America

Manufacturer
NASA Ames Research Center

Location
Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Chantilly, VA
Hangar
James S. McDonnell Space Hangar

Type
PERSONAL EQUIPMENT-Pressure Suits

Materials
Overall: Aluminum honeycomb,fiberglass and PVC, anodized aluminum
Dimensions
Approximate: 6 ft. tall x 5 ft. 6 in. long x 2 ft. 4 in. wide x 1 ft. 1 in. deep (182.88 x 167.64 x 71.12 x 33.02cm)

AX-2Advanced Extra-Vehicular Suit

Patent # 3,405,406

1968

During the course of the early space program, research continued into the development of full pressure suits and various avenues were explored. The Advanced Extra-Vehicular Suit (AES) programs started in the 1960s for the development of long-term lunar exploration, continuing through the development of advanced technology suits for the space station. These suits operated at a higher internal pressure than the "soft" suits, and maintained a constant volume when pressurized, and do not require a lengthy oxygen "pre-breathe" time, or elaborate internal restraint system to control the "ballooning" effect of pressurization in soft suits. The materials used in the construction of these suits would provide protection for the wearer from micro-meteoroids, and their constant volume and advanced joints meant that the astronauts could use less energy while performing tasks on the lunar surface, These suits were relatively comfortable to wear as their weight was supported by an internal harness, however, the suits were never used on a mission in part because of their size and the difficulties associated with space in the Apollo command module.

The AX-2 was designed at NASA Ames Research Center in the mid-1960s. A lunar prototype suit designed to operate at 5 pounds per square inch , it has "stovepipe" mobility joints, and metal bellows and a bearing at the waist. Sealed bearings between the stovepipe joints allowed each element to rotate. Although the suit functioned as intended, NASA chose the "soft" suit for use on the lunar surface.

Transferred from NASA - Ames Research Center

The AX-2 was designed at NASA Ames Research Center in the mid-1960s by "Vic" Vykukal. A lunar prototype suit designed to operate at 5 pounds per square inch, it has "stovepipe" mobility joints, metal bellows, and a bearing at the waist. Sealed bearings between the stovepipe joints allowed each element to rotate. Although the suit functioned as intended, NASA chose the "soft" suit for use on the lunar surface, and this suit was the last of its type.

Transferred to NASM from NASA - Ames Research Center in 2004.

Transferred from NASA, Ames Research Center.

Country of Origin
United States of America

Manufacturer
NASA Ames Research Center

Location
Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Chantilly, VA
Hangar
James S. McDonnell Space Hangar

Type
PERSONAL EQUIPMENT-Pressure Suits

Materials
Overall: Aluminum honeycomb,fiberglass and PVC, anodized aluminum
Dimensions
Approximate: 6 ft. tall x 5 ft. 6 in. long x 2 ft. 4 in. wide x 1 ft. 1 in. deep (182.88 x 167.64 x 71.12 x 33.02cm)

AX-2Advanced Extra-Vehicular Suit

Patent # 3,405,406

1968

During the course of the early space program, research continued into the development of full pressure suits and various avenues were explored. The Advanced Extra-Vehicular Suit (AES) programs started in the 1960s for the development of long-term lunar exploration, continuing through the development of advanced technology suits for the space station. These suits operated at a higher internal pressure than the "soft" suits, and maintained a constant volume when pressurized, and do not require a lengthy oxygen "pre-breathe" time, or elaborate internal restraint system to control the "ballooning" effect of pressurization in soft suits. The materials used in the construction of these suits would provide protection for the wearer from micro-meteoroids, and their constant volume and advanced joints meant that the astronauts could use less energy while performing tasks on the lunar surface, These suits were relatively comfortable to wear as their weight was supported by an internal harness, however, the suits were never used on a mission in part because of their size and the difficulties associated with space in the Apollo command module.

The AX-2 was designed at NASA Ames Research Center in the mid-1960s. A lunar prototype suit designed to operate at 5 pounds per square inch , it has "stovepipe" mobility joints, and metal bellows and a bearing at the waist. Sealed bearings between the stovepipe joints allowed each element to rotate. Although the suit functioned as intended, NASA chose the "soft" suit for use on the lunar surface.

Transferred from NASA - Ames Research Center

ID: A20040264000