Liberty 12 Model A (Ford) V-12 Engine

Liberty 12 Model A (Ford) V-12 Engine

     

The Liberty engine was America's most important contribution to aeronautical technology during World War I. Jesse G. Vincent of Packard and Elbert J. Hall of Hall-Scott co-designed it in mid-1917 for the U.S. government, which wanted a standard design in 4-, 6-, 8-, and 12-cylinder versions that could be quickly mass-produced to equip U.S. combat aircraft. Automakers Ford, Lincoln, Packard, Marmon, and Buick produced 20,748 Liberty 12s before the Armistice, which insured their widespread use into the 1920s and '30s.

This is one of the four Ford Motor Co. Liberty 12 Model A's that powered the Navy-Curtiss NC-4, the first aircraft to cross the Atlantic Ocean, May 16-31, 1919. The Model A also powered such aircraft as the de Havilland DH-4, Fokker T2, Loening Model 23, Douglas World Cruiser, Douglas M-1 Mailplane, and Curtiss H-16 flying boat.

Transferred from the U.S. Navy Department, Bureau of Aeronautics, Washington, D.C.

Physical Description:
Weight: 383 kg (844 lb)

Country of Origin
United States of America

Designer
Elbert J. Hall
Manufacturer
Ford Motor Company
Designer
Jesse G. Vincent

Date
1919

Location
Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Chantilly, VA
Hangar
Boeing Aviation Hangar

Type
PROPULSION-Reciprocating & Rotary

Materials
Metal
Dimensions
Length 171.1 cm (67.375 in.), Width 68.6 cm (27.0 in.), Height 105.4 cm (41.5 in.)

Ford Liberty 12 Model A

The Liberty engine was America's most important contribution to aeronautical technology during World War I. Jesse G. Vincent of Packard and Elbert J. Hall of Hall-Scott co-designed it in mid-1917 for the U.S. government, which wanted a standard design in 4-, 6-, 8-, and 12-cylinder versions that could be quickly mass-produced to equip U.S. combat aircraft. Automakers Ford, Lincoln, Packard, Marmon, and Buick produced 20,748 Liberty 12s before the Armistice, which insured their widespread use into the 1920s and '30s.

This is one of the four Liberty 12 Model A's that powered the Navy-Curtiss NC-4, the first aircraft to cross the Atlantic Ocean, May 16-31, 1919. The Model A also powered such aircraft as the de Havilland DH-4, Fokker T2, Loening Model 23, Douglas World Cruiser, Douglas M-1 Mailplane, and Curtiss H-16 flying boat.

Transferred from the U.S. Navy, Bureau of Aeronautics

Type: reciprocating, 12 cylinders, V-type, liquid cooled

Power rating: 298 kW (400 hp) at 1,800 rpm

Displacement: 27 L (1,649 cu in)

Weight: 383 kg (844 lb)

Manufacturer: Ford Motor Co., Detroit, Mich.

A19230029000

The Liberty engine was America's most important contribution to aeronautical technology during World War I. Jesse G. Vincent of Packard and Elbert J. Hall of Hall-Scott co-designed it in mid-1917 for the U.S. government, which wanted a standard design in 4-, 6-, 8-, and 12-cylinder versions that could be quickly mass-produced to equip U.S. combat aircraft. Automakers Ford, Lincoln, Packard, Marmon, and Buick produced 20,748 Liberty 12s before the Armistice, which insured their widespread use into the 1920s and '30s.

This is one of the four Ford Motor Co. Liberty 12 Model A's that powered the Navy-Curtiss NC-4, the first aircraft to cross the Atlantic Ocean, May 16-31, 1919. The Model A also powered such aircraft as the de Havilland DH-4, Fokker T2, Loening Model 23, Douglas World Cruiser, Douglas M-1 Mailplane, and Curtiss H-16 flying boat.

Transferred from the U.S. Navy Department, Bureau of Aeronautics, Washington, D.C.

Physical Description:
Weight: 383 kg (844 lb)

Country of Origin
United States of America

Designer
Elbert J. Hall
Manufacturer
Ford Motor Company
Designer
Jesse G. Vincent

Date
1919

Location
Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Chantilly, VA
Hangar
Boeing Aviation Hangar

Type
PROPULSION-Reciprocating & Rotary

Materials
Metal
Dimensions
Length 171.1 cm (67.375 in.), Width 68.6 cm (27.0 in.), Height 105.4 cm (41.5 in.)

Ford Liberty 12 Model A

The Liberty engine was America's most important contribution to aeronautical technology during World War I. Jesse G. Vincent of Packard and Elbert J. Hall of Hall-Scott co-designed it in mid-1917 for the U.S. government, which wanted a standard design in 4-, 6-, 8-, and 12-cylinder versions that could be quickly mass-produced to equip U.S. combat aircraft. Automakers Ford, Lincoln, Packard, Marmon, and Buick produced 20,748 Liberty 12s before the Armistice, which insured their widespread use into the 1920s and '30s.

This is one of the four Liberty 12 Model A's that powered the Navy-Curtiss NC-4, the first aircraft to cross the Atlantic Ocean, May 16-31, 1919. The Model A also powered such aircraft as the de Havilland DH-4, Fokker T2, Loening Model 23, Douglas World Cruiser, Douglas M-1 Mailplane, and Curtiss H-16 flying boat.

Transferred from the U.S. Navy, Bureau of Aeronautics

Type: reciprocating, 12 cylinders, V-type, liquid cooled

Power rating: 298 kW (400 hp) at 1,800 rpm

Displacement: 27 L (1,649 cu in)

Weight: 383 kg (844 lb)

Manufacturer: Ford Motor Co., Detroit, Mich.

A19230029000

ID: A19230029000