Martin EB-57B Canberra

Martin EB-57B Canberra

     

After the Korean Conflict began in 1950, the USAF looked for a jet medium bomber to replace the aging Douglas B-26 Invader. In March 1951, the USAF contracted with the Glenn L. Martin Co. to build the Canberra in the U.S. under a licensing agreement with English Electric. The Martin-built B-57 made its first flight on July 20, 1953, and when production ended in 1959, a total of 403 Canberras had been produced for the USAF.

Donated by the 158th DSES.

Physical Description:
Two-seat, twin-engine jet bomber; ECM version.

Country of Origin
United States of America

Manufacturer
Martin Aircraft Co.

Date
1953

Type
CRAFT-Aircraft

Dimensions
Overall: 472.44 x 1996.44cm, 26671.5kg, 1950.72cm (15ft 6in. x 65ft 6in., 58800lb., 64ft) UPDATE- EMPTY WEIGHT SHOULD BE AROUND 27,000lb.

The B-57 is a modified version of the English Electric Canberra which was first flown in Britain on May 13, 1949, and later produced for the Royal Air Force (RAF). After the Korean Conflict began in 1950, the USAF looked for a jet medium bomber to replace the aging Douglas B-26 Invader. In March 1951, the USAF contracted with the Glenn L. Martin Co. to build the Canberra in the U.S. under a licensing agreement with English Electric. The Martin-built B-57 made its first flight on July 20, 1953, and when production ended in 1959, a total of 403 Canberras had been produced for the USAF.

NASM's Canberra is one of 202 B-57Bs built by Martin. In the early 1960s it was assigned to Aeronautical Systems Division at Wright-Patterson AFB as a test aircraft. In 1965 it was selected for return to combat configuration to replace combat losses in Southeast Asia. It arrived at Clark AB, Philippines on March 20, 1967 and was assigned to the 8th Bomb Squadron at Phan Rang, South Vietnam, from where it flew combat missions for 2 1/2 years. It was then brought back to the U.S., converted to an electronic countermeasures EB-57B, and assigned to the Kansas Air National Guard (ANG) and later to the Vermont ANG. The aircraft was flown to the Museum on August 20, 1981.

Crew: Pilot and electronic warfare officer

Cost: $1,264,000

PERFORMANCE

Maximum speed: 570 mph.

Cruising speed: 450 mph.

Range: 2,000 miles

Service Ceiling: 49,000 ft.

After the Korean Conflict began in 1950, the USAF looked for a jet medium bomber to replace the aging Douglas B-26 Invader. In March 1951, the USAF contracted with the Glenn L. Martin Co. to build the Canberra in the U.S. under a licensing agreement with English Electric. The Martin-built B-57 made its first flight on July 20, 1953, and when production ended in 1959, a total of 403 Canberras had been produced for the USAF.

Donated by the 158th DSES.

Physical Description:
Two-seat, twin-engine jet bomber; ECM version.

Country of Origin
United States of America

Manufacturer
Martin Aircraft Co.

Date
1953

Type
CRAFT-Aircraft

Dimensions
Overall: 472.44 x 1996.44cm, 26671.5kg, 1950.72cm (15ft 6in. x 65ft 6in., 58800lb., 64ft) UPDATE- EMPTY WEIGHT SHOULD BE AROUND 27,000lb.

The B-57 is a modified version of the English Electric Canberra which was first flown in Britain on May 13, 1949, and later produced for the Royal Air Force (RAF). After the Korean Conflict began in 1950, the USAF looked for a jet medium bomber to replace the aging Douglas B-26 Invader. In March 1951, the USAF contracted with the Glenn L. Martin Co. to build the Canberra in the U.S. under a licensing agreement with English Electric. The Martin-built B-57 made its first flight on July 20, 1953, and when production ended in 1959, a total of 403 Canberras had been produced for the USAF.

NASM's Canberra is one of 202 B-57Bs built by Martin. In the early 1960s it was assigned to Aeronautical Systems Division at Wright-Patterson AFB as a test aircraft. In 1965 it was selected for return to combat configuration to replace combat losses in Southeast Asia. It arrived at Clark AB, Philippines on March 20, 1967 and was assigned to the 8th Bomb Squadron at Phan Rang, South Vietnam, from where it flew combat missions for 2 1/2 years. It was then brought back to the U.S., converted to an electronic countermeasures EB-57B, and assigned to the Kansas Air National Guard (ANG) and later to the Vermont ANG. The aircraft was flown to the Museum on August 20, 1981.

Crew: Pilot and electronic warfare officer

Cost: $1,264,000

PERFORMANCE

Maximum speed: 570 mph.

Cruising speed: 450 mph.

Range: 2,000 miles

Service Ceiling: 49,000 ft.

ID: A19810663000