Film Magazine, Far-infrared, Balloon Borne Telescope

Film Magazine, Far-infrared, Balloon Borne Telescope

     

This is a film magazine and supporting parts from the star field camera on the SAO balloon telescope. This experiment was a multi-purpose, multi-institutional telescope facility for infrared astronomical studies. The camera magazine was part of a suite of instruments fed by a balloon-borne Cassegrain telescope with a 102-cm mirror. The telescope was built in 1971 by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) and flown nineteen times since 1972; thirteen of those flights were successful. A total of six different infra-red instruments were flown at the focal plane of the mirror. Data gathered with this instrument contributed significantly to the understanding of a number of fundamental astronomical problems and geophysical problems. The gondola system also represents an important stage in the development of stabilized platforms in scientific ballooning.

It was transferred by SAO to NASM in 1996.

Transferred from the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory

Country of Origin
United States of America

Manufacturer
Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory

Location
Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Chantilly, VA
Hangar
Boeing Aviation Hangar

Type
CRAFT-Balloons & Parts

Materials
Overall - anodized aluminum, optics, electronics
Dimensions
Overall: 9in. x 1ft 3in. x 1ft 7in. (22.9 x 38.1 x 48.3cm)

This is a film magazine and supporting parts from the star field camera on the SAO balloon telescope. This experiment was a multi-purpose, multi-institutional telescope facility for infrared astronomical studies. The camera magazine was part of a suite of instruments fed by a balloon-borne Cassegrain telescope with a 102-cm mirror. The telescope was built in 1971 by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) and flown nineteen times since 1972; thirteen of those flights were successful. A total of six different infra-red instruments were flown at the focal plane of the mirror. Data gathered with this instrument contributed significantly to the understanding of a number of fundamental astronomical problems and geophysical problems. The gondola system also represents an important stage in the development of stabilized platforms in scientific ballooning.

It was transferred by SAO to NASM in 1996.

Transferred from the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory

Country of Origin
United States of America

Manufacturer
Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory

Location
Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Chantilly, VA
Hangar
Boeing Aviation Hangar

Type
CRAFT-Balloons & Parts

Materials
Overall - anodized aluminum, optics, electronics
Dimensions
Overall: 9in. x 1ft 3in. x 1ft 7in. (22.9 x 38.1 x 48.3cm)

ID: A19960566000