Pressure Suit, Sokol KV-2, Dennis Tito

California businessman Dennis Tito wore this Sokol KV-2 spacesuit when he became the first tourist in space on April 28, 2001. After months of training and preparation in Moscow and at the Cosmonaut Flight Training Center in Star City, Russia, Tito was launched aboard the Soyuz TM-32 from Baikonur, Kazakhstan, and spent six days in the International Space Station. He paid the Russians a reported $20 million for this adventure.

The Sokol ("Falcon") spacesuit was designed in the early 1970s to protect cosmonauts during launch, landing, and emergencies. The plugs and tubes extending from the suit connect to life-support systems built into the Soyuz spacecraft. Mr. Tito donated his suit to the Museum in 2003.

Gift of Dennis Tito

Country of Origin
Russia

Astronaut
Dennis Tito
Manufacturer
Zvezda

Location
National Air and Space Museum, Washington, DC
Exhibition
Moving Beyond Earth

Type
PERSONAL EQUIPMENT-Pressure Suits

Materials
Synthetic canvas (beta cloth), elasticized elbow and knees, Metal rings at neck and wrists
Dimensions
Overall: 5ft 3 1/2in. x 2ft 4in. x 9in. (161.29 x 71.12 x 22.86cm)
Approximate (object on plex seated mount): 69.9 × 68.6 × 139.7cm, 10kg (27 1/2 × 27 × 55 in., 22lb.)

California businessman Dennis Tito wore this Sokol KV-2 spacesuit when he became the first tourist in space on April 28, 2001. After months of training and preparation in Moscow and at the Cosmonaut Flight Training Center in Star City, Russia, Tito was launched aboard the Soyuz TM-32 from Baikonur, Kazakhstan, and spent six days in the International Space Station. He paid the Russians a reported $20 million for this adventure.

The Sokol ("Falcon") spacesuit was designed in the early 1970s to protect cosmonauts during launch, landing, and emergencies. The plugs and tubes extending from the suit connect to life-support systems built into the Soyuz spacecraft. Mr. Tito donated his suit to the Museum in 2003.

Gift of Dennis Tito

Country of Origin
Russia

Astronaut
Dennis Tito
Manufacturer
Zvezda

Location
National Air and Space Museum, Washington, DC
Exhibition
Moving Beyond Earth

Type
PERSONAL EQUIPMENT-Pressure Suits

Materials
Synthetic canvas (beta cloth), elasticized elbow and knees, Metal rings at neck and wrists
Dimensions
Overall: 5ft 3 1/2in. x 2ft 4in. x 9in. (161.29 x 71.12 x 22.86cm)
Approximate (object on plex seated mount): 69.9 × 68.6 × 139.7cm, 10kg (27 1/2 × 27 × 55 in., 22lb.)

ID: A20030122000