Saab J-29-F

Saab J-29-F

     

Tunnan means "The Barrel." The J-29 has frequently been called the Flying Barrel. One look at the jet will explain why. The J-29 was built in combat and reconnaissance versions. Although a two-seat, side-by-side training variant was planned, production timelines forced the cancellation of the program. A radar-equipped, all-weather version was also studied and cancelled in 1950, for the same reasons as the trainer version. Later, improved wings were added to J-29C aircraft that improved load factors during maneuvering. Additionally, in order to raise the critical Mach number from 0.86 to 0.89, the leading edge slat on the outboard part of the wing was deleted and the chord of the same section increased. This modification resulted in a "dog-tooth" shape. The increased capability of the aircraft allowed the installation of afterburning engines. They were also equipped with a pair of AIM-9B sidewinder missiles. The Saab J-29C was the first Swedish combat aircraft to be equipped with radar warning receivers to alert the pilot to enemy radar lock-ons or attacks.

After 1968 the only remaining examples flew with the aggressor squadron, some became tow planes for aerial targets. The Museum's J-29 is painted to reflect the markings of the United Nations. The Swedish Air Force's Saab J-29 was a participant in the UN Deployment of aircraft to Katanga in the early 1960s.

Donated by the Swedish Royal Air Force.

Physical Description:
Low swept-wing, single-seat, single-engine (centrifugal-flow gas-turbine), jet fighter. Natural metal finish with United Nations markings.

Country of Origin
Sweden

Manufacturer
Saab

Date
1948

Type
CRAFT-Aircraft

Materials
Flush-riveted, all-metal construction.
Dimensions
Overall: 12ft 4in., 10096.9lb. (3.76m, 4579.9kg)
Other: 12ft 4in. x 33ft 7in. x 36ft 1in. (3.76m x 10.236m x 10.998m)

Tunnan means "The Barrel." The J-29 has frequently been called the Flying Barrel. One look at the jet will explain why.

By 1945, it was clear that in the future all Swedish combat aircraft would be jet powered. Because of that philosophy, all propeller projects were cancelled. Work had begun on jet engines, but production models could not be ready until 1952, too late for any aircraft project started in 1945. As a quick fix, de Havilland Vampires were purchased in 1945 and license production of its Goblin engine was started for the jet engined variant of Saab's J-21 fighter.

It was clear early in the program that the Goblin was too small for the new "JxR" fighter being planned. In December 1945, the de Havilland Ghost engine, still in the early stages of design, was selected for licensed production in Sweden.

The very first "Barrel" concept in October 1945 had straight wings, but in November Saab came into possession of German research material, via intelligence reports provided by Switzerland. The reports revealed the advantages of swept back wings. The 45 degree sweep favored by Germans designers was deemed too extreme and unstable. Additionally, the weight of the wing had to be increased to support the swept design. A compromise of a 25 degree sweep back was selected, together with leading edge slats.

The Saab 29 prototype first flew on 1 Sept 1948. It had full span flaperons (a combination of lifting flaps and maneuvering ailerons), but later models had separate flaps and ailerons. The reasoning behind flaperons was simple: since the ailerons had to be powered anyway, and artificial feel introduced, combining them with flaps wouldn't change the feel of the controls, and would actually allow lower landing speeds.

To improve range, wing tanks were introduced. On 6 May 6 1954, a J-29B set a world record on a closed 500 km circuit of 977 km/h previously held by an F-86.

The J-29 was built in combat and reconnaissance versions. Although a two-seat, side-by-side training variant was planned, production timelines forced the cancellation of the program. A radar-equipped, all-weather version was also studied and cancelled in 1950, for the same reasons as the trainer version. Later, improved wings were added to J-29C aircraft that improved load factors during maneuvering. Additionally, in order to raise the critical Mach number from 0.86 to 0.89, the leading edge slat on the outboard part of the wing was deleted and the chord of the same section increased. This modification resulted in a "dog-tooth" shape. The increased capability of the aircraft allowed the installation of afterburning engines. They were also equipped with a pair of AIM-9B sidewinder missiles. The Saab J-29C was the first Swedish combat aircraft to be equipped with radar warning receivers to alert the pilot to enemy radar lock-ons or attacks.

After 1968 the only remaining examples flew with the aggressor squadron, some became tow planes for aerial targets.

The Museum's J-29 is painted to reflect the markings of the United Nations. The Saab J-29 was a participant in the UN Deployment of aircraft to Katanga in the early 1960s.

Tunnan means "The Barrel." The J-29 has frequently been called the Flying Barrel. One look at the jet will explain why. The J-29 was built in combat and reconnaissance versions. Although a two-seat, side-by-side training variant was planned, production timelines forced the cancellation of the program. A radar-equipped, all-weather version was also studied and cancelled in 1950, for the same reasons as the trainer version. Later, improved wings were added to J-29C aircraft that improved load factors during maneuvering. Additionally, in order to raise the critical Mach number from 0.86 to 0.89, the leading edge slat on the outboard part of the wing was deleted and the chord of the same section increased. This modification resulted in a "dog-tooth" shape. The increased capability of the aircraft allowed the installation of afterburning engines. They were also equipped with a pair of AIM-9B sidewinder missiles. The Saab J-29C was the first Swedish combat aircraft to be equipped with radar warning receivers to alert the pilot to enemy radar lock-ons or attacks.

After 1968 the only remaining examples flew with the aggressor squadron, some became tow planes for aerial targets. The Museum's J-29 is painted to reflect the markings of the United Nations. The Swedish Air Force's Saab J-29 was a participant in the UN Deployment of aircraft to Katanga in the early 1960s.

Donated by the Swedish Royal Air Force.

Physical Description:
Low swept-wing, single-seat, single-engine (centrifugal-flow gas-turbine), jet fighter. Natural metal finish with United Nations markings.

Country of Origin
Sweden

Manufacturer
Saab

Date
1948

Type
CRAFT-Aircraft

Materials
Flush-riveted, all-metal construction.
Dimensions
Overall: 12ft 4in., 10096.9lb. (3.76m, 4579.9kg)
Other: 12ft 4in. x 33ft 7in. x 36ft 1in. (3.76m x 10.236m x 10.998m)

Tunnan means "The Barrel." The J-29 has frequently been called the Flying Barrel. One look at the jet will explain why.

By 1945, it was clear that in the future all Swedish combat aircraft would be jet powered. Because of that philosophy, all propeller projects were cancelled. Work had begun on jet engines, but production models could not be ready until 1952, too late for any aircraft project started in 1945. As a quick fix, de Havilland Vampires were purchased in 1945 and license production of its Goblin engine was started for the jet engined variant of Saab's J-21 fighter.

It was clear early in the program that the Goblin was too small for the new "JxR" fighter being planned. In December 1945, the de Havilland Ghost engine, still in the early stages of design, was selected for licensed production in Sweden.

The very first "Barrel" concept in October 1945 had straight wings, but in November Saab came into possession of German research material, via intelligence reports provided by Switzerland. The reports revealed the advantages of swept back wings. The 45 degree sweep favored by Germans designers was deemed too extreme and unstable. Additionally, the weight of the wing had to be increased to support the swept design. A compromise of a 25 degree sweep back was selected, together with leading edge slats.

The Saab 29 prototype first flew on 1 Sept 1948. It had full span flaperons (a combination of lifting flaps and maneuvering ailerons), but later models had separate flaps and ailerons. The reasoning behind flaperons was simple: since the ailerons had to be powered anyway, and artificial feel introduced, combining them with flaps wouldn't change the feel of the controls, and would actually allow lower landing speeds.

To improve range, wing tanks were introduced. On 6 May 6 1954, a J-29B set a world record on a closed 500 km circuit of 977 km/h previously held by an F-86.

The J-29 was built in combat and reconnaissance versions. Although a two-seat, side-by-side training variant was planned, production timelines forced the cancellation of the program. A radar-equipped, all-weather version was also studied and cancelled in 1950, for the same reasons as the trainer version. Later, improved wings were added to J-29C aircraft that improved load factors during maneuvering. Additionally, in order to raise the critical Mach number from 0.86 to 0.89, the leading edge slat on the outboard part of the wing was deleted and the chord of the same section increased. This modification resulted in a "dog-tooth" shape. The increased capability of the aircraft allowed the installation of afterburning engines. They were also equipped with a pair of AIM-9B sidewinder missiles. The Saab J-29C was the first Swedish combat aircraft to be equipped with radar warning receivers to alert the pilot to enemy radar lock-ons or attacks.

After 1968 the only remaining examples flew with the aggressor squadron, some became tow planes for aerial targets.

The Museum's J-29 is painted to reflect the markings of the United Nations. The Saab J-29 was a participant in the UN Deployment of aircraft to Katanga in the early 1960s.

ID: D19670163000