Smithsonian Air and Space Museum
Mutual Concerns
Mutual Concerns

2013 Agenda

This is the agenda for the 2013 Conference.

SATURDAY, APRIL 27

Registration and Reception at the Red Lion Hotel on Fifth Avenue

3:30 – 8:00 pm
Conference Registration
5:00 – 6:30 pm
Opening Reception/Networking
light hors d'oeuvres
6:30 – 7:30 pm
Welcome

Keynote Presentation

Harold K. Skramstad, Jr., President Emeritus
The Henry Ford

"Professionalism" has become a ubiquitous term. Yet in the process of becoming so, it now means so many different things in so many different areas that it has become a less than useful concept . In his keynote address Harold Skramstad will discuss what professionalism has meant for the evolving museum community in the past and explore how air and space museums might give the concept more focus and meaning in defining their work in the future.

SUNDAY, APRIL 28

Registration and all sessions at the Museum of Flight
Complimentary shuttle provided at the beginning and end of day between the Red Lion Hotel and the Museum of Flight.

7:30 am
Buses depart the Red Lion Hotel for the Museum of Flight
7:45 – 8:45 am
Breakfast and free time at the Museum
Breakfast provided
8:45 – 10:15 am

Welcome and Opening Plenary Session:

Blend and Balance: Museum Employees and Professionalism
Speakers:

  • Malcolm Collum, Chief Conservator, Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum
  • Scott Marchand, Director of Collections & Aircraft Restoration, Pima Air & Space Museum

Chair:

  • Stephen Quick, Director General, Canada Aviation and Space Museum

This session will be a two-part presentation that will include an overview and introduction to the wider museum professional community, the general ideas behind career-track training, and a look at supplementary mid-career training opportunities. Scott Marchand will discuss professional and academic backgrounds, as well as the variety of backgrounds found in the air and space museum community. He will also lead a discussion on available educational programs and training opportunities to develop formal professionalism as defined and understood by the AAM.

The second part, led by Malcolm Collum, will illustrate professionalism in action. By drawing on the structure laid out in the previous sections, he will demonstrate how clearly defined roles and responsibilities reinforce a culture of mutual respect.

10:15 – 10:35 am
Break
10:35 am – 12:05 pm

Concurrent Sessions:

Digitizing Your Collections: Basic Photography and Workflow
Speakers:

  • Eric Long, Senior Photographer, Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum
  • Benjamin Sullivan, Photographer/CIS/IRM, Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Chair:

  • Benjamin Kristy, Aviation Curator, National Museum of the Marine Corps

Digitizing collections is a key component to the operations of a professional museum. Having high quality images of your collection, which can be easily managed and shared, is helpful for collections management, public relations, and even fundraising. Good planning before starting to digitize your collection will avoid many expensive and time-consuming problems down the road (remember an iPhone is not a professional camera!). This session is a primer on how to capture, modify, and store professional grade images of museum artifacts.

The first half of the session will cover proper photographic procedures to ensure the highest results, even within restrictive budget limitations. Proper use of digital cameras, lighting for museum artifacts (which is not as difficult as you might think), and selection of the right digital file format and size for use now and in the future, will be among the topics covered in the first part of the session. In the second half, attendees will learn a basic workflow for processing the images captured, including working with RAW vs. JPEG files, metadata, and color management.

This session is relevant for any museum professional that handles a camera and takes pictures. There will be a separate informal "tutoring" session with the speakers later in the conference (exact time TBA) for those who want/need additional hands-on help with how to get the best performance from their camera gear.

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Generative Boards and Successful Museums
Speakers:

  • Richard Beckerman, Museum Consultant, Museum Consulting Services
  • Harold, Skramstad, President Emeritus, Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield Village

Chair:

  • Robert Casey, Retired, Curator of Transportation, The Henry Ford

Boards govern nonprofits in three fundamental ways: with a fiduciary focus, strategically, and generatively. With fiduciary responsibility, boards oversee financial performance, which informs their future review for budgets and other metrics. As a museum matures, the board looks further into the future for strategic goals that increases a museum's relevance to its community and visitors, leading the museum towards greater sustainability. With a generative board, there is planning for a long-range future that builds a rich network of support and makes the museum an essential part of the community, ensuring its long-term health. This session touches on the significant features of improved board performance for museums large and small.

This session is open to all participants, but seeks to address the particular challenges of museum executives and administrators.

12:05 – 1:35 pm
Lunch
Lunch provided
1:35 – 2:50 pm
Concurrent Sessions:

Fountains of Youth: Developing a Teen and College Age Work Force
Speakers:

  • Jennifer McIntosh, Discovery Station Program Coordinator, Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum
  • Zeta Strickland, Science Interpretation and Discovery Corps Manager, Pacific Science Center

Chair:

  • Austin Fisher, Museum Apprentice (Teen Volunteer), The Museum of Flight

Teens and college students are an exceptionally valuable resource to any type of museum, but the technology focus of air and space museums make these workers wonderful ambassadors for our community in particular. This session will feature a show-and-tell on successful models of teen programs in action and help you gain tips and insights to creating your own teen workforce. The show-and-tell will provide participants with an understanding of replicable and scalable working models, and offer tips and guidance on what works and what does not with this demographic group for volunteer work and service.

This session will also discuss how museums can work with these digital natives to tap into current trends to stay relevant with new generation of museum-goers. Examples of paid and unpaid programs will be provided, as well as resources for taking back to museum educators for developing such a workforce.

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Collections Management: Simple Tasks to Employ Now to Avoid Complications in the Future
Speakers:

  • Dan Hagedorn, Chief Curator, The Museum of Flight
  • Benjamin Kristy, Aviation Curator, National Museum of the Marine Corps
  • Jessica Williams, Curator of History, Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum

Chair:

  • Eric Boehm, Curator, Aviation and Aircraft Restoration, Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum

Collections care, or the lack of it, can have a great impact on a museum. Inefficient or absent collections management may not only give rise to damaging and costly legal problems, it can cost a museum its professional and public reputation. Good management can limit these problems, save provenance expenses, enhance the institution's professional reputation for collections stewardship, and aid a museum in creating dynamic and thoughtful exhibits.

This session will use the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum as an example of how improper collections management can be overcome and the basic steps institutions can use to avoid pitfalls. It will illustrate the basic steps museums should be taking now when considering acquisitions, tracking donations and objects, and caring for their collection. The session will also look at the steps a museum should take when it is overwhelmed by objects which have not been properly documented in the past or has a collection with little provenance or paperwork.

The fundamental principles of collections management and processes will be provided along with basic documents of receipt, deeds, and a simple inventory highlighted. The processes presented can be undertaken by even the smallest staff to ensure high professional integrity of an institution and its collection.

2:50 – 3:00 pm
Break
3:00 – 4:30 pm
Concurrent Sessions:

Zen and the Art of Hanging Things in Museums
Speakers:

  • Brian Benjamin Cohen, Rigging, Sales Manager, Reed Rigging, Inc.
  • Russell Dusek, Installation Rigging Master, Reed Rigging, Inc.
  • Mark Smith, Partner, Century Aviation

Chair:

  • Thomas E. Cathcart, Director, Aircraft Collections and Restoration, The Museum of Flight

Larger air museums generally have staff and budgets to hang aircraft and other large artifacts from the ceilings of their building, but many museums, especially smaller ones, are often challenged in their ability to accomplish even relatively simple hanging tasks. This session will explore how institutions can aesthetically and safely suspend large items above their exhibit area, ensuring the physical and historical integrity of the artifact while preparing it for display in a realistic simulation of its historical attitude. In this demonstration, the panel members and rigging crew will be hanging a Heath Parasol in the exhibit hall of the Museum of Flight. Materials, equipment and techniques used will be examined as they relate to air museum needs.

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Generation Why Us: A Young Museum Professional’s Roundtable
Speakers:

  • Marina Hernandez, Onsite and Outreach Educator, The Museum of Flight
  • Valerie Johnson, Airpark Educator, The Museum of Flight

Chair:

  • Dan Hagedorn, Chief Curator, The Museum of Flight
In order for our industry to flourish, we need to ensure that we have systems in place to recruit, retain, support, and promote the next generation of aerospace museum professionals, as well as developing effective succession plans. This roundtable discussion will examine the challenges and opportunities of these issues from both the institutional and professional sides of our field. The panel will include both novice and veteran professionals and the session is looking for all participants to come prepared to join in with their thoughts and experience on the following topics:

What can young professionals contribute to your institution?
What skills do young professionals bring to an institution?
How can institutions be a competitive employee of young professionals?
What makes an institution a competitive employer?
What challenges arise when creating a succession plan?
What does “professionalizing” the field mean?
4:30 – 5:15 pm

Plenary Session:

NEWS FROM THE FIELD
This is your opportunity to give a three-minute update on what's going on at your museum. When the bell rings, you're done. If you would like to give an update, please email nasmmutualconcerns@si.edu with your name, museum and the topic you'll discuss.

5:15 pm
End of Sunday's sessions
Buses begin departure from museum to the Red Lion Hotel.

MONDAY, APRIL 29

All Sessions at the Museum of Flight
Complimentary shuttle provided at the beginning and end of day between the Red Lion Hotel and the Museum of Flight.


7:30 am
Buses depart the Red Lion Hotel for the Museum of Flight
7:45 – 8:45 am
Breakfast and free time at the Museum
Breakfast provided
8:45 – 10:15 am

Concurrent Sessions:

Museum Consultants: Mercenaries or Militia?
Speakers:

  • Richard Beckerman, Museum Consultant, Museum Consulting Services
  • Ralph Bufano, President Emeritus, Museum of Flight, Bufano Management
  • Kenneth DeHoff, Executive Director, Pacific Aviation Museum - Pearl Harbor

Chair:

  • John R. Zukowsky, Museum Consultant, Museum and Historical Consulting

Mercenaries, soldiers of fortune, outsourcing, and sometimes consultants and free-lancers, are words that often have negative connotations, although we should be reminded that aerial consultants and paid volunteers such as the Flying Tigers and Eagle Squadron pilots in World War II were lauded for their service.

In today’s museum world, as for many non-profits and businesses, outsourcing, consulting, and short-term contracts are more common now than a decade ago, with consultants and contract workers providing a way for museums to increase the professionalism and range of content and services in their environment without long-term financial commitment. On the other hand, what is often perceived as short-term commitment can project an image of no commitment to an institution's long-term survival and goals.

This session will include consultants and clients on the panel and examine both sides of this proverbial coin, to suggest the most effective use of consultants for aviation museums. It will explore pros and cons of consultants in an open discussion with an aim to help both large and small museums determine when to hire a consultant for what price ranges and tasks.

This session is open to all participants, but seeks to address the particular challenges of museum executives and administrators.

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Building Community Together Through Service-Learning — A Case Study
Speakers:

  • Alex Allyne, Program Coordinator, Western Washington University Center for Service Learning
  • Kate Granat Simmons, Director of Programs and Administration, Heritage Flight Museum
  • April McMurry, Program Coordinator, Western Washington University Center for Service Learning
  • Mary Sass, Assistant Professor of Management, Western Washington University College of Business & Economics

Chair:

  • Seth Margolis, Director of Education Programs, The Museum of Flight

For small museums, access to consultants can be cost prohibitive. For university or college students, gaining real-world experience is critical to kick starting a career in any field. At Western Washington University, the Center for Service Learning is bringing students and non-profits together with the support of innovative instructors who understand the benefits to both parties. This session will be a case study on how Heritage Flight Museum has partnered with Prof. Mary Sass’ upper-level Management class “Organizations in Change” to provide meaningful experience for students and invaluable guidance for the museum. Join us to learn how such a partnership can benefit your organization while developing the next generation of professional, volunteer, and supporter.

10:15 – 10:30 am
Break
10:30 – 12:00 pm

Concurrent Sessions:

Digitization: Past, Present and Future
Speakers:

  • Carl J. Bobrow, Museum Specialist, Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum
  • Alan Renga, Archivist, San Diego Air & Space Museum

Chair:

  • Erik Satrum, Head Registrar, Collections Division, Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Like many museums, the Smithsonian Institution has begun working to formalize policies and procedures related to digitization, and one of the first museums in the institution to comprehensively deal with the ins and outs of this topic been the National Air and Space Museum. NASM has been working to translate abstract goals to manage digital assets, establish a digitization program, and build organizational capacity into a functional set of tools and standards for day-to-day operations.

An excellent example of another institution developing a process, and extending the reach of their digitization efforts into the larger world, is the initiative of The San Diego Air & Space Museum (SDASM). SDASM has digitized more than 135,000 aerospace-related photos and films and placed them online using Flickr and YouTube. One of the most valuable results of this process has been the vast amount of data the Museum has received about the images and films, including additional information and corrections.

This session will be divided in its format with the presentations from NASM and SDASM explaining the development and implementation of their initiatives, followed by questions directed to those attending, regarding the “what, how, and why this,” of digitization to help participants develop a more comprehensive understanding of the process.

The session will end with a discussion by participants about their efforts at digitization. Please come to this session with news about what your museum may be doing in digitization along with the highlights and pitfalls there have been in the process.

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Master Plans 101
Speakers:

  • Don Otto, President, Science Museum Oklahoma
  • Stephen Ryan, Director, Freeman Ryan Design

Chair:

  • Jeffrey C. Cannon, Principal, Ayers Saint Gross

As a component of museum professionalism, facility master plans are living documents. Plans often outlive the service of the board members, and occasionally the senior staff. A master plan or guiding document serves as a bridge over the years and is constantly updated. This session will review the menu of items a master plan should cover as part of the institution's strategic plan. Master plans can be as simple as prioritizing initiatives or as complex as donor-driven requirements.

This session is open to all participants, but seeks to address the particular challenges of museum executives and administrators.

12:00 – 1:45 pm
Lunch
Lunch provided

Lunch Session: Recovering Aircraft from Extreme Environments
Speakers:

  • Mary Ryan, Professor of Materials Science & Nanotechnology, Imperial College London
  • Ian Thirsk, Head of Collections, Royal Air Force Museum
  • Tim Wallis, Conservation Manager, Royal Air Force Museum

Chair:

  • Peter Dye, Director General, Royal Air Force Museum

This lunchtime session will discuss the issues involved in recovering aircraft from extreme environments including the practical challenges, conservation aspects, and exhibition options. Two case studies, about recovery from two very diverse environments, will be provided based on recent RAF Museum experiences: the recovery of a RAF P40 Kittyhawk fighter abandoned in the Western Desert for nearly 70 years; and the recovery of a Dornier Do-17 bomber from the English Channel after more than 70 years underwater. There will be particular emphasis on the environmental context, the material science opportunities, and the benefits of a collaborative approach. The speakers will discuss the keys to tackling similar projects, including how to anticipate issues involved in these projects and how to develop a more rigorous, comprehensive, and effective plan for the recovery, conservation, and exhibition of artifacts recovered from extreme environments.

The latest thinking on object recovery will be highlighted. In the past, recovery had sometimes been characterized by a lack of professionalism with the rapid retrieval of the object seen as more important than consideration of the conservation or exhibition challenges. Too often, the material science aspects were not addressed or left until major deterioration occurred. The speakers will look at the critical importance of drawing on the collective experience of recovery, restoration, and collection sectors before considering mobilization and using cross-functional partnerships, to address the material science aspects and garner external support and funding.

1:45 – 3:15 pm

Concurrent Sessions:

When Making the News is Making the News
Speakers:

  • Debra Mixis, Director of Marketing, Air Zoo
  • Luke Sacks, Director, Public Relations & Corporate Communications, Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum

Chair:

  • Kimberly Robinson, Director of Operations, Air Zoo

Whether you are from a small museum, a large-themed experience, or somewhere in between you cannot rely on new, exciting expansions, exhibits, or openings to draw the media to your door.

We will discuss how New York City's Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum made the most of the national, regional and local media coverage for the arrival of Space Shuttle Enterprise and also how the Air Zoo creates media excitement and nurtures long term relationships over its everyday activities.

Join our fun, lively conversation as we compare and contrast the strategies of two institutions that are different in many ways but have both successfully accomplished public relations and marketing goals.

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Accreditations and Affiliations Anyone?
Speakers:

  • Ralph Bufano, President Emeritus, Museum of Flight, Bufano Management
  • Douglas King, President and CEO, The Museum of Flight
  • Eric Taylor, Lead, Heritage 4Culture

Chair:

  • Peter W. Bro, Facility Director, Future of Flight Foundation

What are the benefits of accreditation and the various choices of accreditation bodies? A survey of the offerings of the American Alliance of Museums (AAM, formerly known as American Association of Museums); Association of Science and Technology Centers (ASTC); American Association of State and Local History (AASLH); regional museum associations; state museum associations; and Smithsonian Affiliates. There are several benefits of joining one or more of these associations: they are an inexpensive source of professional development for staff and boards; they offer potential collaborations for joint promotions and marketing; and they provide cost sharing opportunities for staff support, like sharing a conservation specialist or guest curator. Smithsonian Affiliations also offers benefits such as co-branding, access to traveling exhibits, and curatorial or collections expertise.

Attend this session to learn about what opportunities for membership and collaboration could be available to your museum.

This session is open to all participants, but seeks to address the particular challenges of museum executives and administrators.

3:15 pm
Buses begin departure from museum to the Red Lion Hotel.

There are no formal events for the evening, but there is an optional activity (additional cost listed below).

7:10 – 10:00 pm
Baseball game at Safeco Field
Watch the Seattle Mariners take on the Baltimore Orioles. The game starts at 7:10 p.m. Seats will be together in the main level of the stadium. Participants will head to the stadium on public transportation with Mutual Concerns staff.

$35 per person optional, additional cost.
Find out more about the Seattle Mariners.

TUESDAY, APRIL 30

All Sessions at the Museum of Flight
Complimentary shuttle provided at the beginning and end of day between the Red Lion Hotel and the Museum of Flight.


7:30 am
Buses depart the Red Lion Hotel for the Museum of Flight
7:45 – 8:30 am
Breakfast and free time at the Museum
Breakfast provided
8:30 – 10:15 am
Free time and touring at the Museum
8:30 – 11:30 am

Workshop Session

Exhibitions They'll Remember: Making Exhibitions an Active Learning Experience
Speakers:

  • Tim Grove, Education Specialist, Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum
  • Michael Hulslander, How Things Fly Gallery Manager, Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Chair:

  • Robert Casey, Retired, Curator of Transportation, The Henry Ford

At the National Air and Space Museum, Education staff helps exhibition teams to develop active learning environments through creating interactive experiences, directed-looking labels for different ages, inquiry labels, and exploration areas. Recent exhibitions have used these techniques to broaden access and engage wider audiences, including an early childhood audience. This session will identify various techniques for increasing active learning in exhibitions; discuss how directed-looking and inquiry make a label more active; show examples of techniques that are effective; and apply this new knowledge to examples at their institution. The workshop will engage participants in critical thinking to explore the techniques that make an exhibition active versus passive.

This is a special workshop session that runs for three hours Tuesday morning and is limited to 30 participants. Pre-registration will start Sunday.

10:15 – 11:30 am

Concurrent Session:

Museums that Fly! And Working with Them at Your Museum
Speakers:

  • Greg Anders, Executive Director, Heritage Flight Museum
  • Adrian Hunt, Executive Director, Flying Heritage Collection
  • John T. Sessions, CEO, Historic Flight Foundation

Chair:

  • Margy Natalie, Acting Onsite Learning Manager, Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Leaders of three northwest museums will present how they “keep ‘em flying” as a main part of their mission. The unique challenges of flying museums will be presented: from working with the FAA to fly passengers and running rigorous flight programs and restoration and maintenance operations, to supporting non-flying museums and air shows. All these combine to provide a tremendous and exceptional visitor experience. But how do they work with air show venues and non-flying museums to manage liability and risks? What is involved with having aircraft fly-in to support your museum? Come to this session to hear how some museums make flying aircraft operations possible and how they work with other venues.

11:30 am – 1:15 pm
Lunch and free time at the Museum
Lunch provided
1:15 – 2:45 pm

Concurrent Sessions:

Hold On, Hold Out, and Hold Fast: Survivability in Small Museums
Speakers:

  • Karen Hinton, Director of Development, Planes of Fame Air Museum
  • Mike Luedey, Board Member, Canadian Museum of Flight & Transportation
  • Allan Snowie, Exploratory Committee Chairman, Heritage Flight Museum

Chair:

  • Kate Granat Simmons, Director of Programs and Administration, Heritage Flight Museum

Keeping a small museum surviving and thriving is a perpetual challenge—from securing a location, facility and land lease, making short- and long-range plans and establishing yourself as a cultural asset, to facing the big issues of founders syndrome or a move to a new location. For small museums, these problems can stir passions and seem insurmountable. But through sharing our issues, our solutions, and our successes we can all learn lessons from each other that will help us stay the course of achieving survivability in our organizations. Join our panelists in an open discussion that includes a presentation of their own museum's obstacles, and calls for you to share your own.

This session is open to all participants, but seeks to address the particular challenges of museum executives and administrators.

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Borders, Be Damned!: Transcontinental and Transnational Education and Professional Development Programs
Speakers:

  • Jenny Cousins, AAM, Project Leader, American Air Museum in Britain
  • Troy Hoehne, Teacher, Aviation High School
  • Margy Natalie, Acting Onsite Learning Manager, Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum
  • Linda Peterson, Teacher, Woodmoor Elementary School

Chair:

  • Seth Margolis, Director of Education Programs, The Museum of Flight

This presentation will highlight cooperative projects and educational programs between museums. As the world becomes an increasingly smaller space, we are able to share our knowledge, expertise, and experiences with a broader audience including students, teachers, and our own staff and volunteers. Our increased ability to communicate in a number of ways, including interactive video conferencing, can expand our educational programming and incorporate things like volunteer-to-volunteer presentations. You will hear about some projects that have crossed borders to bring the best educational programming to teachers and volunteers.

2:45 – 3:00 pm
Break
3:05 – 4:30 pm
Concurrent Sessions:

Saving Our Past's Future: An Introduction to Cultural Resource Management
Speakers:

  • Eric Boehm, Curator, Aviation and Aircraft Restoration, Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum
  • Holly Hood Volunteer, Heritage Flight Museum
  • Ashley Zuckerburg, Volunteer, Heritage Flight Museum

Chair:

  • Stewart Bailey, Curator, Evergreen Aviation & Space Museum

This session will help any museum professional understand the significant role of cultural resource management and how it relates to air and space museums. Attendees will learn how to protect their valuable resources for current and future generations through seeking nomination with the National Historic Register (NHR). The presentation will include information on Cultural Resource Management (CMR), and how to access properties based on the four National Register Criteria. It will cover the benefits of NHR and the steps for applying. Museums, especially small museums, need to explore support from diverse sources in order to succeed and using the support of the NHR could be one way to do this. This session will specifically address resources small museums have access to within the NHR.

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Managing Risk
Speakers:

  • Pat Beene-Colasanti, Chief Financial & Administrative Officer, Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum
  • Matt Hayes, Chief Financial Officer, The Museum of Flight

Chair:

  • David Kerr, Chief Operating Officer, Wings Over the Rockies Air & Space Museum

Effective risk management is essential to the successful achievement of the mission and goals of every not-for-profit organization. So why does it seem some museums make the right decisions and others do not? This session will examine how risk management applies to aviation museums by looking at what questions need to be raised, how you identify and prioritize organizational risks, and what strategies might you apply to mitigate each risk. Topics to be covered include financial and strategic risk assessment and management, legal/regulatory risks, human resource issues, technological issues, operational management, insurance issues, security, and disaster planning. Finally, based on one aviation museum's encounter, what we can learn from the recent Sandy experience as it applies to our museums and collections. Will we be prepared for the next inevitable natural disaster?

4:30 – 4:45 pm
Sessions conclude

Critiques, door prize drawings and closing remarks

WEDNESDAY MAY 1: OPTIONAL FIELD TRIPS

 
Grand City Tour of Seattle by Tours Northwest
10:00 am
Shuttle departs the Red Lion Hotel

Explore the city of Seattle with this premier tour opportunity. Stops on this 50-mile Seattle Tour include the Space Needle, two hours at Pike Place Market, Pioneer Square, the Ballard Locks, and a great city skyline photo opportunity.

Lunch is on your own at Pike Place Market. Find out more about the Grand City Tour.

4:00 pm
Shuttle arrives at the Red Lion Hotel

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Paine Field Tour
8:15 am
Shuttle departs the Red Lion Hotel
9:00 – 10:30 am
Tour of Boeing Future of Flight
The Future of Flight Aviation Center & Boeing Tour offer the only opportunity to tour a commercial jet assembly plant in North America.

Find out more about the Future of Flight.
11:00 am – 1:00 pm
Tour of Museum of Flight Restoration Center The center is home to approximately three dozen aircraft in varying states of restoration by the Museum's restorers. We will tour the facility with docents.

Box lunch provided.

Find out more about the Museum of Flight Restoration Center.
1:15 – 2:45 pm
Tour of the Flying Heritage Collection The Flying Heritage Collection is a premier aviation attraction, with something of interest for visitors of all ages. In 1998, Paul G. Allen began acquiring and preserving iconic warriors and workhorses of the WWII era, many of which are the last of their kind. Allen's passion for aviation and history, and his awareness of the increasing rarity of original WWII aircraft, motivated him to restore these artifacts to the highest standard of authenticity and share them with the public.

Find out more about the Flying Heritage Collection.
3:00 – 5:00 pm
Tour of Historic Flight at Kilo 7
Historic Flight at Kilo-7 offers a collection of the most important aircraft produced between 1927 and 1957 — all restored and airworthy again. Interest and weather permitting there is an opportunity for Mutual Concerns attendees to fly in either a B-25 Mitchell Bomber or a Douglas DC-3. There is an additional charge to fly, please see Paine Field Tour Costs section for details.

Find out more about the Historic Flight at Kilo 7.
6:00 pm
Shuttle arrives at Red Lion Hotel.

 

Seattle Tour Cost

The field trip fee for the Seattle city tour is $90. This fee includes:

  • Admission fees for all venues (including a ticket to go up the Space Needle).
  • Roundtrip transportation from the Red Lion Hotel.

Paine Field Tour Costs

The field trip fee of $100. This fee includes

  • Admission to all venues
  • Box lunch
  • Roundtrip transportation from the Red Lion Hotel.

Optional 30-minute flying opportunity at Historic Flight in B-25 Mitchell Bomber or a Douglas DC-3. Additional fees for flying are:
B25-Mitchell Bomber -- $40
Douglas DC-3 -- $85

Please note these optional flights are dependent on the weather and number of participants interested. Mutual Concerns will refund fees after the conference if you reserve a flight and it does not take place. Seating is limited and will be reserved on a first- come, first-served basis.