Electronic Systems Used by the Allies on D-Day

This list of key electronic system designations used on D-Day was collated by Professor J.W.S. Pringle in his survey of the Telecommunications Research Establishment (Britain’s electronic R&D organization), published as “The Work of TRE in the invasion of Europe (IEEE Proceedings, Vol. 132. Pt. A., No. 6, October 1985).

Abdullah: Airborne L-band (390-1550 MHz) homing equipment to enable single-seat aircraft to locate German Wurzburg radar stations

AI Mark VIII: S-band (1550-5200 MHz) air interception radar used in night fighters

Air Cigar: Airborne jamming equipment for enemy VHF communications; incorporates equipment known as Jostle

AMES Type 7: Fixed P-band ground control station of the Chain Home (GCI)

AMES Type II: Mobile L-band (390-1550 MHz) ground stations used for early warning and ground control

AMES Type 13: Mobile S-band ground station used for height finding (CMH)

AMES Type 14: S-band coastal early warning station for extra low cover (CHEL)

AMES Type 15: Mobile P-band ground stations used for early warning or ground control (COL/GCI)

AMES Type 16: Fixed L-band (390-1550 MHz) ground station used for long range control of fighter formations

AMES Type 21: Fixed or mobile S-band (1550-5200 MHz) ground station used for early warning or ground control; includes AMES Type 13

AMES Type 22: Mobile composite ground station comprising AMES Types 11 and 13, with interrogator equipment

AMES Type 24: Special fixed S-band (1550-5200 MHz) height finding ground station used with AMES Type 16 for long range control of fighter formations

AMES Type 25: Mobile composite convoy comprising AMES Types 11, 13, 15 and 21, with interrogator equipment

ASB: American L-band (390-1550 MHz) airborne equipment for detection of surface vessels; fitted in British naval aircraft

ASV Mark III: Airborne S-band (1550-5200 MHz) equipment for detection of surface vessels (ASV)

ASV Mark V: American S-band (1550-5200 MHz) airborne equipment for the detection of surface vessels (ASG); fitted in British Coastal Command aircraft

Bagful: Self-recording L-band (390-1550 MHz) equipment for the interception of signals from enemy Wurzburg radar

Carpet: Self-tuning L-band (390-1550 MHz) jamming equipment for use against enemy Wurzburg radar

Coal Scuttle: L-band (390-1550 MHz) Search system using a Bagful receiver combined with an H2S scanner

Eureka: Miniature P-band (150-390 MHz) portable ground beacon used with Rebecca equipment for homing of troop carrier and supply aircraft

Eureka H: Mobile ground beacon used with Rebecca 'H'

GEE: Airborne [hyperbolic] navigation system used on path-difference measurements from [pairs] of ground stations

GH [or Gee-H]: Airborne blind bombing system based on range measurements from pairs of ground stations

Ground Cigar: High power ground station for jamming of enemy VHF communications, especially night fighter communications

H: The basic principle of navigation by range cuts from two ground stations [hyperbolic navigation]

H2S: S-band (1550-5200 MHz) airborne equipment for the detection of built-up areas and coastlines

H2X: X-band (5200-11000 MHz) airborne equipment for the detection of built-up areas and coastlines

IFF [Identification Friend or Foe] Mark III: Universal airborne P-band (150-390 MHz) identification equipment

Jostle: Airborne jamming equipment for use against enemy VHF communications especially in armored formations

Lucero: Airborne P-band (150-390 MHz) interrogator equipment always fitted as an addition to S-band (1550-5200 MHz) or X-band (5200-11000 MHz) airborne radar, to provide IFF and beacon facilities

Mandrel: Airborne jamming equipment for use against enemy Freya radar

Moonshine: Airborne equipment for the simulation of mass formations in enemy radar

Oboe Mark I: P-band (150-390 MHz) system for the accurate control of aircraft for blind bombing

Oboe Mark II: S-band (1550-5200 MHz) system for the accurate control of aircraft for blind bombing

Ping Pong: Special mobile L-band (390-1550 MHz) ground station for accurate direction finding on enemy Wurzburg radar

Rebecca: P-band (150-390 MHz) airborne equipment used in troop carrier and supply aircraft for the location of dropping zones

Rebecca H: P-band (150-390 MHz) airborne navigation system working on the 'H' principle

Speckled Band: Automatic airborne GEE repeater equipment for small aircraft

Window [Chaff]: Tinfoil strips used for the deception of radar