July, 2014

Crossing the Line, Pillinger Point and TARs

 
Crossing the Line

 




Crossing the Line

The map (left) shows the Curiosity roverís travels from its landing site at Bradbury Landing to its 663rd Martian day, or sol (June 18, 2014). NASAís Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) provided the base image for the map. At the time, the rover was still inside its landing ellipse, the area designated safe for the rover to land in. The image (right), taken by MRO on June 27, reveals the rover crossing the ellipse (indicated by the light blue line). Its future exploration will now take it over exciting new terrain that was too dangerous for it to land on.

Map courtesy of NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory-Caltech/University of Arizona/USGS
Image courtesy of NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory-Caltech/University of Arizona

   

Pillinger Point


Pillinger Point

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity captured this view of "Pillinger Point" on May 14, 2014. The rover is on the western rim of Endeavour Crater, looking into the crater. The eastern rim is visible on the horizon. Endeavour Crater is 22 kilometers (14 miles) in diameter. This area was selected for further investigation because a clay mineral named montmorillonite was found there by orbiting craft. Montmorillonite forms under wet conditions and may provide some help in understanding the red planetís watery past.

Image courtesy of NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory-Caltech/Cornell University/Arizona State University

   

TARs


TARs

The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's high-resolution imager HiRISE captured this false-color image of a valley filled with long ridges. Referred to as transverse aeolian ridges or TARs, these ripple-like features were created by the wind. Smaller ripples project out from the sides of the ridges, creating a feathery appearance.

Image courtesy of NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory/University of Arizona

   

 



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