Smithsonian Air and Space Museum

Apollo 17 Landing Site

Taurus-Littrow
20.19080° N latitude, 30.77168° E longitude

The landing site for the final Apollo lunar landing mission, Taurus-Littrow, takes its name from the Taurus mountains and Littrow crater which are located in a mountainous region on the southeastern rim of the Serenitatis basin.

The actual target landing site is at 30° 44' 58.3" east longitude by 20° 9' 50.5" north latitude — about 750 km east of the Apollo 15 landing site at Hadley Rille.

The site was surrounded by three high, steep massifs. Most of the plain between the massifs is covered by a dark mantle which apparently has no large blocks or boulders, and which had been interpreted to be a pyroclastic deposit. The dark mantle is pocked by several small, dark halo craters that could be volcanic vents all near the landing site.

Another prominent landing site feature was an 80-meter high scarp trending roughly north-south near the west side of the valley into the north massif.

From Apollo 17 Press Kit.

Apollo Landing Sites

Apollo Landing Sites Map.

Apollo 17 Landing Site

Apollo 17 Landing Site, Taurus-Littrow Region. NASA photograph AS17-0447.

Apollo 17 Traverses

Apollo 17 Traverse Map. Diagram based on Apollo 17 Traverses Lunar Photomap, Edition 1, Sheet 43D1S2[25]