Martin B-26B-25-MA Marauder "Flak-Bait"

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    Martin B-26B-25-MA Marauder "Flak-Bait"

    Twin engine medium bomber. Wing Span 2,160 cm (850 in.), Length 1,780 cm (701 in.), Height 660 cm (260 in.), Weight 10,886 kg (23,999 lb)

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    CCO - Creative Commons (CC0 1.0)

    This media is in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). You can copy, modify, and distribute this work without contacting the Smithsonian. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Martin B-26B-25-MA Marauder "Flak-Bait"

    Twin engine medium bomber. Wing Span 2,160 cm (850 in.), Length 1,780 cm (701 in.), Height 660 cm (260 in.), Weight 10,886 kg (23,999 lb)

    2 of 13

    CCO - Creative Commons (CC0 1.0)

    This media is in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). You can copy, modify, and distribute this work without contacting the Smithsonian. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Martin B-26B-25-MA Marauder "Flak-Bait"

    Twin engine medium bomber. Wing Span 2,160 cm (850 in.), Length 1,780 cm (701 in.), Height 660 cm (260 in.), Weight 10,886 kg (23,999 lb)

    3 of 13

    CCO - Creative Commons (CC0 1.0)

    This media is in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). You can copy, modify, and distribute this work without contacting the Smithsonian. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Martin B-26B-25-MA Marauder "Flak-Bait"

    Twin engine medium bomber. Wing Span 2,160 cm (850 in.), Length 1,780 cm (701 in.), Height 660 cm (260 in.), Weight 10,886 kg (23,999 lb)

    4 of 13

    CCO - Creative Commons (CC0 1.0)

    This media is in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). You can copy, modify, and distribute this work without contacting the Smithsonian. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Martin B-26B-25-MA Marauder "Flak-Bait"

    Twin engine medium bomber. Wing Span 2,160 cm (850 in.), Length 1,780 cm (701 in.), Height 660 cm (260 in.), Weight 10,886 kg (23,999 lb)

    5 of 13

    "Flak-Bait" in Restoration Hangar

    Martin B-26B-25-MA Marauder Flak-Bait in the Mary Baker Engen Restoration Hangar, March 2015.

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    Martin B-26B Marauder Flak-Bait

    Patrick Robinson, Mary Baker Engen Restoration Hangar staff member, and aeronautics curator Jeremy Kinney prepare the nose of the Martin B-26B Marauder Flak-Bait for its move to the National Air and Space Museum's Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia. Photographed at the National Mall Building, Washington, DC; June 11, 2014.

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    "Flak-Bait" Moves to the Restoration Hangar

    The nose section of the Martin B-26B Marauder "Flak-Bait" arrived at the Mary Baker Engen Restoration Hangar at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia on June 19, 2014.

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    Flak-Bait in Conservation

    Conservator Sharon Norquest works on the Martin B-26B-25-MA Marauder "Flak-Bait" in the Mary Baker Engen Restoration Hangar.

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    Flak-Bait in Restoration Hangar

    The Museum's Martin B-26B-25-MA Marauder Flak-Bait is currently undergoing preservation in the Mary Baker Engen Restoration Hangar.

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    Flak-Bait in Restoration Hangar

    Flak-Bait’s major airframe components together after delivery to the Mary Baker Engen Restoration Hangar of the Steven F. Udvar Hazy Center in 2015

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    A Brief History of "Flak-Bait"

    Curator Jeremy Kinney shares the history of the Martin B-26B-25-MA Marauder "Flak-Bait." 

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    Behind the Scenes with "Flak-Bait" Ask an Expert Live

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Display Status:

This object is on display in the Mary Baker Engen Restoration Hangar at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, VA.

Mary Baker Engen Restoration Hangar

Project engineer Peyton M. Magruder designed the Glenn L. Martin Company's B-26 Marauder in response to an Army Air Corps specification issued in January 1939. This specification also caught the attention of North American Aviation, Inc., and that firm responded with the B-25. War fever caused the Air Corps to forego a prototype test stage and both bombers went from the drawing board straight into production. The consequences were deadly for men flying the Martin bomber. The Army threatened to withdraw the aircraft from combat, but Marauder crews stuck with their airplane. By war's end, they had lost fewer airplanes than almost any other combat unit and compiled a notable war record.

The NASM B-26B-25-MA nicknamed "Flak-Bait" (AAF serial number 41-31773) survived 206 operational missions over Europe, more than any other American aircraft during World War II (A de Havilland Mosquito B. Mk. IX bomber completed 213 missions but this aircraft was destroyed in a crash at Calgary Airport in Canada, two days after V-E Day, see NASM D. H. 98 Mosquito). Workers at the Baltimore factory completed "Flak-Bait" in April 1943, and a crew flew it to England. The AAF assigned it to the 449th Bombardment Squadron, 322nd Bombardment Group (nicknamed the 'Annihilators'), and gave the bomber the fuselage identification codes "PN-O." Lt. James J. Farrell of Greenwich, Connecticut, flew more missions in "Flak-Bait" than any other pilot. He named the bomber after "Flea Bait," his brother's nickname for the family dog.