Stinson L-5 Sentinel

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    Stinson L-5 Sentinel

    Roughly derived from the pre-war Stinson Model 105 Voyager. L-5A was a modified L-5 with an improved electrical system; the L-5B had a deeper fuselage to carry a stretcher; the L-5C was equipped with a reconnaissance camera; the L-5E had improved control surfaces; and the L-5G had a more powerful engine.

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    Usage Conditions Apply

    There are restrictions for re-using this media. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Stinson L-5 Sentinel

    Roughly derived from the pre-war Stinson Model 105 Voyager. L-5A was a modified L-5 with an improved electrical system; the L-5B had a deeper fuselage to carry a stretcher; the L-5C was equipped with a reconnaissance camera; the L-5E had improved control surfaces; and the L-5G had a more powerful engine.

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    Stinson L-5 Sentinel at the Udvar-Hazy Center

    Versatile, durable, and an important aircraft of World War II, the L-5 flew a wide variety of missions: photo reconnaissance, resupply, evacuation of wounded, message courier, VIP transport, and artillery spotting.
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Display Status:

This object is on display in the Boeing Aviation Hangar at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, VA.

Boeing Aviation Hangar

Versatile, durable, and an important aircraft of World War II, the L-5 flew a wide variety of missions: photo reconnaissance, resupply, evacuation of wounded, message courier, VIP transport, and artillery spotting. Its design was roughly derived from the pre-war Stinson Model 105 Voyager. The Army Air Corps purchased six Voyagers from Vultee Aircraft (which had acquired Stinson) in 1941 for testing. Refitted with the Lycoming O-435-1 engine, the aircraft was designated the Model 75. While it had features and components of the Voyager series, it was fundamentally a new design.

The Army ordered this model in quantity, designating it first as the O-62 ("O" for observation), then as the L-5 ("L" for liaison) when the type designation was changed in 1942. This aircraft was the first O-62/L-5 produced.