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Ready for Lift-Off: Reimagining Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum

Posted on Tue, October 24, 2017
  • by: Hillary Brady, Digital Experiences
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Reimaging Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum. 1. We’re staying open. 2. There’s even more to see at our Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center. 3. We’ll be sharing new objects and new stories. 4. Our digital platforms bring the collection to you. 5. You can

Five things you should know about the reimagining of Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum.

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  1. We are staying open: The Museum will remain open during the project. Construction will be divided into two phases, so there will still be plenty to see and explore on your visit.  
     
  2. There's more to see at our Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center: Have you been to our Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia? We’ve already begun putting aircraft from our collection on public display for the first time at the Udvar-Hazy Center in preparation for construction (like the Sikorsky JRS-1!). There will be engaging programming and other must-see artifacts to check out throughout the project.
     
  3. We're sharing new objects and new stories: There are new stories and new objects on the way. You will see Neil Armstrong’s Apollo 11 spacesuit after conservation (thanks to #RebootTheSuit!), a return of the Command Module Columbia, and even new artifacts, like the historic F-1 engines recovered by Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos.  
     
  4. Our digital platforms bring the collection to you: Whether you’re in the Museum or sitting on the sofa back at home, you can explore many of our 60,000+ collection objects online. From apps to behind-the-scenes blog posts to 3D tours to new resources created just for educators, the history of aviation and spaceflight is at your fingertips.
     
  5. You can stay connected for updates: Visit airandspace.si.edu/reimagine for the latest updates, and don’t forget to sign up for our monthly newsletter, What’s Up.

Image in infographic is "Saturn Before Lift-Off," a drawing from our NASA art collection.