Topic

Balloons & Airships

Thu, June 23 2016

Crossing the Atlantic

The flight of the Double Eagle II balloon came to a safe and successful end in a wheat field near Miserey, France, about sixty miles northwest of Paris, on August 17, 1978. The event closed a chapter in the history of flight that had begun when the first human beings ventured aloft in 1783. At long last, the crew of Ben Abruzzo, Maxie Anderson, and Larry Newman, all of Albuquerque, New Mexico, had crossed the Atlantic Ocean. The success of the Double Eagle II, after so many others had failed, was not simply a matter of luck. It can be attributed to a combination of twentieth-century technology, better understanding of weather patterns, and the skill and experience of a crew who achieved one of the oldest goals in flying.

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Crossing the Atlantic

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Thu, June 23 2016

Breaking Geographic Barriers

In 1785, a Frenchman, Jean-Pierre Blanchard, and an American, Dr. John Jeffries, traveled by balloon across the English Channel, conducting the first significant and symbolic flight traversing a geographic obstacle by air. Afterward, crossing the oceans and circumnavigating the globe became the next barriers to be overcome.

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Breaking Geographic Barriers

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Thu, June 23 2016

Ballooning at War

From its inception the balloon’s potential military applications were apparent.  They were used for observation by the Revolutionary Armies of France in 1784 at the Battles of Fleurus and Charleroi. For the next century and a half (or 150 years) militaries used the balloon to varying degrees of success.

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Ballooning at War

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Thu, June 23 2016

The Scientific Method

Lighter-than-air flight grew out of the scientific revolution. Studies of atmospheric physics during the 17th century culminated in Robert Boyle’s description of the relationship between volume, temperature, and pressure and inspired lighter-than-air flight. Chemists in the 18th century began identifying the gases in our atmosphere. Once hydrogen was isolated, the idea of filling a bag with this light gas followed naturally. The inventors of the balloon based their work on the scientific method, a new concept.

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The Scientific Method

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Thu, June 23 2016

The First Way for Humans to Fly

Human beings first took to the sky in balloons. Jacques and Etienne Montgolfier, two paper makers from Annonay, France, designed and built a hot air balloon that carried the first passengers aloft on November 21, 1783. Days later, the chemist Jacques Charles and a companion, Nicolas-Louis Robert, flew in a hydrogen balloon from the Tuileries Palace in Paris. The techniques and technologies of ballooning discovered in the 18th century remain the guiding principles of lighter-than-air flight today.

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The First Way for Humans to Fly

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Thu, June 16 2016

Capturing the Early History of Aeronautics

Among the treasures found within the special collections of the DeWitt Clinton Ramsey Room, a branch of the Smithsonian Libraries located at the National Air and Space Museum, is a collection of oversized scrapbooks with an interesting and complicated history. Originally bound in one volume, William Upcott’s Scrapbook of Early Aeronautica captures the history of lighter-than-air aircraft and aeronautics from 1783 to the 1840s through a rich collection of newspaper clippings, articles, illustrations, and letters.

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Wed, June 15 2016

Take to the Air in the Smithsonian’s Balloon

Visitors to our Innovations in Flight Family Day and Outdoor Aviation Display at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center on June 18, are in for a real treat. In addition to the wide variety of aircraft that will fly in for the event and the other special programs planned, Andrew Richardson, the owner of Adams Balloons LLC of Albuquerque, New Mexico, will be making tethered flights with a new Smithsonian hot air balloon, weather permitting. Realizing that we have a beautiful example of a classic Adams wicker balloon basket on display at the Udvar-Hazy Center, Richardson asked if we would accept a modern hot air balloon envelope sporting the Smithsonian logo and colors into the collection. While the Museum has a world-class collection of balloon baskets and gondolas, we did not, in fact, have an envelope. Anxious to fill that gap, we quickly accepted Richardson’s generous offer.

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Thu, April 21 2016

Cabin, "EXPLORER II"

Launched on November 11, 1935, from the Stratobowl near Rapid City, South Dakota, Explorer II carried Captain Albert Stevens, Captain Orvil Anderson, and an assortment of instruments to a world record altitude of 22,066 meters (72,395 feet).Explorer was the brainchild of Captain Stevens,...

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Thu, April 7 2016

Bud Light Spirit of Freedom Capsule

Bud Light Spirit of Freedom CapsuleFirst Solo Flight Around the World by BalloonSteve Fossett, an adventurous, Chicago-based aviator, launched the Bud Light Spirit of Freedom balloon from Northam, Australia, on June 19, 2002. Fourteen days and 19 hours later, on July 4, he landed...

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Thu, April 7 2016

Gondola, Breitling Orbiter 3

On March 21, 1999, Bertrand Piccard and Bryan Jones guided Breitling Orbiter 3, the first balloon to fly around the world non-stop, to a safe landing on a desolate stretch of desert in Western Egypt. It was a happy ending to a story that had begun in June 1980, when English pilot and balloon...

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