Topic

Science & Engineering

Tue, October 10 2017

Mí conversación con el astronauta de la NASA, Danny Olivas

Una de las muchas razones por la cual me encanta trabajar en el Museo Nacional del Aire y del Espacio es que uno nunca sabe a quién va a conocer. Eso es lo que me pasó un día en mayo cuando mis colegas me preguntaron si quería entrevistar en español, al astronauta de la NASA Danny Olivas, para el programa What’s New in Aerospace, que el Museo ofrece en Internet.   

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Thu, October 5 2017

Blade Runner’s Spinners: The Shape of Things to Come?

The “Spinners” flying cars from Ridley Scott's 1982 darkly dystopian Blade Runner film reappear in the sequel, Blade Runner 2049. But are there any hopes for flying cars that can operate from rooftops by 2049?

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Thu, October 5 2017

“Taternauts” and Spacesuits: How Astronauts Stay Safe in Space

The spacesuits that astronauts wear act as their own personal spacerafts--regulating their temperatures, and made to protect them from micrometeorites while outside of the International Space Station. Join the STEM in 30 team as they create their own "space suits" for some astronaut "Taternauts." 

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Tue, October 3 2017

Sputnik and the Space Age at 60

Sputnik, the world’s first human-made satellite of the Earth, was launched on October 4, 1957, marking the beginning of the Space Age and the modern world in which we live today.

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Wed, September 27 2017

Meridiani Planum and the Search for Ice on Mars

If you’re going to Mars, which do you bring: water or a shovel? The question may sound a little tongue-in-cheek, but it actually goes right to the heart of a critical need for future human exploration of Mars – accessible water. Learn how the MARSIS instrument is helping answer this question. 

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Tue, September 26 2017

The Challenge of Communication in Space

Communication is vitally important to astronauts while they are in space. Explore how experts communicate with the astronauts aboard the International Space Station in this week's STEM in 30.

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Fri, September 22 2017

Dreams Soar: Inspiring Women in Aviation

Aviator Shaesta Waiz and her Dreams Soars, Inc, "Dream Team" promoted STEM education to girls from DC Metro Public Schools at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.

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Fri, June 9 2017

The Saga of Writing in Space

From dashing off a quick note to creating painstaking calligraphy, we often take writing for granted. But in space, where the stakes are high, how does one write? After all, the ink in pens isn’t held down by gravity, so how do you write upside down? 

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Mon, June 5 2017

A Brief History of Anti-Ballistic Missile Systems

Last week a United States’ “hit-to-kill vehicle” intercepted and destroyed a mock intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) for the first time during a test. Until fifteen years ago, however, anti-ballistic missiles (ABMs) like the one just tested were banned under the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty signed by the United States and Soviet Union in 1972.   

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Tue, March 14 2017

The F-1 Engine and the Conquest of Space

“A rocket engine is a controlled explosion. So there’s this tension between pushing the technological state of the art and also maintaining safety and reliability," Curator Tom Lassman The F-1 engine remains the highest thrust rocket engine that NASA has ever flown (1.5 million pounds of thrust). The liquid-fueled engine was used during the Apollo program and sat at the bottom of the Saturn V. The engines were designed to be disposable. After reaching a certain altitude, the engines would shut down and fall back into the ocean.  When the Saturn V was taken out of service, NASA shifted from disposable rocketry to reusable rocketry. In recent years, NASA has revisited the F-1 to help inform the next generation of launch vehicles like the Space Launch System (SLS). 

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