Topic

Science & Engineering

Tue, July 12 2016

Uncovering the Moon's Secrets

The Moon and its surface provide insights into the early history of the solar system. Therefore, the origins of the Moon also inform the origins of the Earth.

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Uncovering the Moon's Secrets

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Wed, March 16 2016

Robert Goddard and the First Liquid-Propellant Rocket

Ninety years ago today, on March 16, 1926, Robert H. Goddard (1882-1945) launched the world’s first liquid-propellant rocket. His rickety contraption, with its combustion chamber and nozzle on top, burned for 20 seconds before consuming enough liquid oxygen and gasoline to lift itself off the launch rack. The rocket took off from a snowy field outside Worcester, Massachusetts, reaching a height of about 12.5 meters (41 feet) and a distance of 56 meters (184 feet). It was smashed on impact. Goddard, his wife Esther, and a couple of assistants from Clark University, where he was a physics professor, were the only witnesses.

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Fri, November 27 2015

Comparing Alan Eustace’s Spacesuit with Neil Armstrong’s

Our conservation team had the pleasure of hosting Alan Eustace, former Google executive, engineer, and stratospheric explorer, this month in the Emil Buehler Conservation Laboratory. Eustace and his StratEx team are well known for their three world records including one for the highest altitude jump at 41,422 meters (135,899 feet) in 2014. The adventurer was in town giving a lecture about his historic jump and to donate to the Museum the suit, life support, and balloon equipment module he used during the jump.

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Wed, October 14 2015

Apollo Guidance Computer and the First Silicon Chips

As the Apollo program took form in the early 1960s, NASA engineers always kept the safety of their astronauts at the fore in light of the enormous risks they knew were inherent in the goal of landing on the Moon and returning safely. Wherever possible, they designed backup systems so that if a primary system failed the crew would still have the means to return home safely. Sometimes creating a backup was not always practical. For example, the Service Module’s engine needed to fire while the crew was behind the Moon to place them in a trajectory that would return them to Earth. There was no practical backup if the engine failed. But even in that instance a plan was worked out to use the Lunar Module’s (LM) engine as a backup. D

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Presented Online | Museum in Washington, DC GE Aviation Lecture
December 9, 2019 | 8:00pm

Fast Forward: The Concorde and the Future of Supersonic Flight

Explore the past and future of supersonic flight Fifty years after the Concorde first flew, a new era of innovation and entrepreneurial ideas seeks to make supersonic flight practical and sustainable. Flying passengers at twice the speed of sound, the Concorde captured the imagination...

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Museum in Washington, DC Workshop
June 2020 (exact date TBD) | 8:00am - 4:00pm

2020 Educator Workshops

Check back in the Spring for more information on our Local Educator Workshops Questions about this workshop or field trips? Email NASMteachers@si.edu. ...

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Museum in Washington, DC Workshop
June 19, 2019 | 8:00am - 4:00pm

2019 Educator Workshops

Learn how to give your students an unforgettable experience at the Museum. All teachers are welcome to attend, though workshop materials will be primarily targeted towards middle school audiences.

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Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center Smithsonian TechQuest
July 7, 2018 | 10:30am - 4:00pm

Race to the Moon

It is 1969 and the United States is in a tight race with the Soviet Union to see who can be the first to land humans on the Moon and return them safely to Earth. NASA needs engineers and scientists with real problem-solving skills.

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Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center Smithsonian TechQuest
June 30, 2018 | 10:30am - 4:00pm

Race to the Moon

It is 1969 and the United States is in a tight race with the Soviet Union to see who can be the first to land humans on the Moon and return them safely to Earth. NASA needs engineers and scientists with real problem-solving skills.

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Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center Smithsonian TechQuest
June 23, 2018 | 10:30am - 4:00pm

Race to the Moon

It is 1969 and the United States is in a tight race with the Soviet Union to see who can be the first to land humans on the Moon and return them safely to Earth. NASA needs engineers and scientists with real problem-solving skills.

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