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Tue, July 31 2018

Uncovering the Secrets of the Ranger 7

During the conservation of the Museum's Ranger 7 spacecraft, our conservator and space history curator uncovered some unexpected details about the object. 

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Ranger Spacecraft Cameras and Lens

Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Welcomes Oracle Challenger III

The National Air and Space Museum will receive Sean D. Tucker’s Oracle Challenger III high-performance aircraft for the future “We All Fly” exhibition. The museum has received a $10 million gift from the Thomas W. Haas Foundation for construction of the gallery, which will be named the “Thomas W. Haas We All Fly” gallery in recognition of the foundation’s gift. The Oracle Challenger III will be displayed at the entrance to the gallery, the first exhibition at the museum in more than four decades to be dedicated exclusively to general aviation.

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Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Welcomes Oracle Challenger III

Artist Rendering of Tom W. Haas We All Fly Gallery
Tue, July 24 2018

Spaceflight and Surviving Shark Attacks

Shaq does shark week. Ronda Rousey against a bull shark. Bear Grylls faces off with … yes … a shark. Shark Week is full of celebrities having close encounters with one of the ocean’s greatest predators, but did you know early astronauts were also prepared for their own tussle with the fearsome fish?

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Shark Repellent, Project Mercury
Sat, July 14 2018

The Grave of Quentin Roosevelt

On July 14, 1918, Quentin Roosevelt, son of President Theodore Roosevelt, died outside of Chamery, France, his Nieuport 28 shot down by a German pilot. To American aviators and soldiers, the grave of Quentin Roosevelt became a shrine, his death a touchstone for service and sacrifice, appearing in many World War I era scrapbooks and collections held by the National Air and Space Museum Archives.

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Soldier Views Grave of Quentin Roosevelt, Chamery, France
Presented Online Ask an Expert
July 11, 2018 | 12:30pm

Changing Roles for Woman in Astronomy

In this week's Ask an Expert on Facebook Live, join curator David DeVorkin for a walking tour of the Exploring the Universe gallery, highlighting how four women made contributions to astronomy over time (18th through 20th centuries) and how...

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Vera Rubin at the Flagstaff Telescope

National Air and Space Museum Celebrates “Mars Day!” July 20 

The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum will present “Mars Day!,” its annual tribute to the Red Planet Friday, July 20, from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. at the museum on the National Mall. This is the one time of year the museum’s scientists from its Center for Earth and Planetary Studies bring their work to the museum galleries and interact with visitors, discussing their research and their work on NASA missions.

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National Air and Space Museum Celebrates “Mars Day!” July 20 

The Next Mars Rover at Mars Day!

Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum To Hold “Asteroid Day” Event June 30

The National Air and Space Museum will host “Asteroid Day: Defending Planet Earth” June 30 at the museum in Washington, D.C., and online. A panel of asteroid experts will discuss the threats asteroids pose and how to protect the Earth from the danger they may cause. This is part of the global “Asteroid Day” event, marking the 110th anniversary of the largest impact-related incident in modern history when, June 30, 1908, an asteroid caused a massive air blast that flattened thousands of square miles in Siberia.

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Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum To Hold “Asteroid Day” Event June 30

Artist Illustration of Asteroid Impact
Mon, June 25 2018

Armistice and Peace: Victory Letters from WWI

Letters home from the front reveal the personal side of wars.  On Armistice Day, November 11, 1918, marking the end of World War I, many American soliders serving abroad were instructed to write victory letters to their fathers. As we move towards the celebration of the 100th anniversary of Armistice Day, a pair of victory letters from France and Connecticut illustrate a different understanding between home and the front, armistice and peace. 

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Portrait of Harold F. Pierce, September 1918
Sat, June 23 2018

40 Years of (Triton) Summer

Other planets in our solar system experience seasons, too. On Triton, Neptune’s largest moon, seasons last an average of 40 years, complete with nitrogen snow. Here’s how Triton’s summer solstice compares to Earth’s.

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Triton
Fri, June 22 2018

What an Accidental Discovery Told Us About Pluto

June of this year marks the 40th anniversary of the discovery of Pluto’s largest moon, Charon. At the time of Charon’s discovery, scientists weren’t even looking for it.

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Pluto’s Satellite Charon

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