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Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents “Apollo at the Park”

The National Air and Space Museum has announced Apollo at the Park, an exciting program that will display full-sized statues of Neil Armstrong’s Apollo 11 spacesuit in 15 Major League ballparks across the country, as part of the museum’s nationwide celebration of the 50th anniversary of the first moon landing. America’s national pastime meets history’s greatest adventure June 4 when the first statue will be unveiled at Nationals Park in Washington, D.C. The other 14 suits will appear in ballparks soon after.

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Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents “Apollo at the Park”

Mon, May 13 2019

A Shrinking, Tectonically Active Moon

Recent research conducted by the Lunar Reconnaisance Orbiter (LRO) team indicates that moonquakes on our Moon were caused by active lunar faults -- meaning that the Moon is currently tectonically active and that the moonquakes are a result of the shrinking Moon. 

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New Analysis Shows the Moon Is Tectonically Active

Thousands of young cliff-like, fault scarps detected in images taken by NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) are evidence of a shrinking moon and recently active lunar faults. But just how recently these faults were active was not known.

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New Analysis Shows the Moon Is Tectonically Active

Fri, April 26 2019

A High-Flying Spy Plane

Until recently, a Lockheed U-2, one of the most successful intelligence-gathering aircraft every produced, was on display in the Museum's Looking at Earth gallery. The U-2 was designed by a team led by Clarence L. "Kelly" Johnson at the famous Lockheed 'Skunk Works" in Palmdale, California. The jet played a crucial role during the tense years of the Cold War.

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Thu, April 25 2019

Days of Remembrance: World War I Aviator Dezsö Becker

May 2, 2019, marks the United States’ Days of Remembrance, the nation’s annual commemoration of the Holocaust.  Today the National Air and Space Museum remembers Dezsö Becker, a Hungarian aviator who served in World War I and died in the Buchenwald Concentration Camp in January 1945.

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Neil Armstrong’s Apollo 11 Spacesuit To Go On Display July 16 at Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum

The National Air and Space Museum will celebrate the 50th anniversary of the first moon landing with a five-day celebration at the museum and on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. From July 16, exactly 50 years from the launch of Apollo 11, to July 20, the day Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin took the first steps on the moon, visitors can take part in celebrating this momentous milestone in history. A variety of educational and commemorative activities will take place throughout the week. Regular updates will be posted to the museum’s website.

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Neil Armstrong’s Apollo 11 Spacesuit To Go On Display July 16 at Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum

Tue, April 16 2019

The 100th Anniversary of the First Transatlantic Flight: Transcribe the Albert Read NC-4 Collection

In May 1919, the U.S. Navy sponsored three Curtiss flying boats—the NC-1, NC-3, and NC-4—each with a crew of six, in an attempt to cross the Atlantic Ocean. Lt. Commander Albert C. Read commanded the NC-4, the only aircraft to succeed in its mission.  As we prepare to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the NC-4’s historic transatlantic flight, the materials in Read’s collection are available to transcribe in the Smithsonian’s Transcription Center. 

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Fri, April 5 2019

A Guiding Light: The Airway Beacon Tower

The first pioneering pilots flew the airways during the day without purpose-designed maps. This presented a problem for the U.S. Post Office: Without flying at night, airmail was slower than by railroad and the higher cost of air transport had no value.

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Tue, April 2 2019

Remembering Julian Nott, Ballooning Pioneer

The world of sport aviation suffered a tragic loss on March 25, 2019, with the death of Julian R.P. Nott after an accident on the ground following a successful landing of an experimental balloon. Nott was one of the founders of the modern sport ballooning movement and an innovator in the field.

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Thu, March 28 2019

The Many Flights of the Czar of Baseball

In the wake of the Black Sox Scandal, Baseball was looking to restore its integrity with a leader with his feet firmly on the ground. They elected Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis as the first Commissioner (or “Czar”) of Baseball.  A long-serving jurist from Chicago, Landis was known for his decisions against big businesses, such as Standard Oil, and for slipping out to Cubs and White Sox games.  But Landis also had his head in the clouds, a true aviation enthusiast!

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