All Stories

Showing 51 - 60 of 1322

  • Story
April 03, 2021
I’ll have the Veal! Preservation with a Can-Do Attitude
Our conservators and curators recently faced an interesting question: Is it practical to retain perishable material and what long-range obligations are required? To find the answers, a collaborative effort was required, allowing for preservation of our collection of space food.
Read more
Eating canned food in space
  • Story
April 03, 2021
I’ll have the Veal! Preservation with a Can-Do Attitude
Our conservators and curators recently faced an interesting question: Is it practical to retain perishable material and what long-range obligations are required? To find the answers, a collaborative effort was required, allowing for preservation of our collection of space food.
Read more
Eating canned food in space
  • Story
April 03, 2021
I’ll have the Veal! Preservation with a Can-Do Attitude
Our conservators and curators recently faced an interesting question: Is it practical to retain perishable material and what long-range obligations are required? To find the answers, a collaborative effort was required, allowing for preservation of our collection of space food.
Read more
Eating canned food in space
  • Story
March 31, 2021
The Vera C. Rubin Observatory and Women of Chilean Astronomy
Initially called the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, the Vera C. Rubin Observatory was renamed to honor a pioneer in astronomy, particularly in the field of dark matter. The observatory is perched on Chile’s Cerro Pachón in the foothills of the Andes Mountains and stands as a doorway into exploring the women of Chilean astronomy.
Read more
Vera Rubin and Kent Ford
  • Story
March 30, 2021
A Seat in the Cockpit: Recognizing and Replacing Biases with Gender Inclusive Language
Some of the language once used in the early days of human spaceflight has not kept pace with the evolution of America’s space program. We now use "crewed" or "piloted" instead of "manned," for example. The era of “manned” spaceflight ended long ago, and the continued use of this language diminishes and erases six decades of women’s contributions to spaceflight.
Read more
Astronaut Christina Koch (left) poses for a portrait with flight engineer Jessica Meir
  • Story
March 28, 2021
Sally Ride: Entrepreneur for Space, Science, and Inclusion
For many, their knowledge of Sally Ride begins and ends at her NASA career and the title of the first American woman in space. After she retired from NASA, Sally Ride utilized her groundbreaking status to launch a variety of business ventures (including Space.com and Sally Ride Science) which would inspire the next generation of astronauts and scientists.
Read more
First Class of Female Astronauts
  • Story
March 26, 2021
Anne Noggle’s Photographs of World War II Women Pilots: Portraits of Perspective and Reflection
Anne Noggle (1922–2005) confronts themes of gender equality and aging through portraits of World War II women pilots in the United States and the Soviet Union. Her photographs convey their grit, defiance, femininity, and love of flying. Above all, they capture a spirit that bonds the rare group of aviation heroines together.
Read more
Portrait of Mary Retick Wells
  • Story
March 25, 2021
Remembering Glynn S. Lunney
Remembering the life and legacy of NASA flight director Glynn Lunney.
Read more
Man sitting at a flight control station
  • Story
March 25, 2021
AirSpace Season 4, Ep. 4: Supermassive Black Hole
Today we’re tackling something we’ve wanted to talk about for a long time (which is relative, because time and space lose all meaning there). They’re incredibly dense, super cool, and mind-bendingly-mysterious -- BLACK HOLES! But how do you imagine – let alone study—the unseeable? And seriously—what happened at the end of “Interstellar?”
Read more
AirSpace, a podcast, logo
  • Story
March 24, 2021
Explore the Wright Flyer
Explore all of the rich content about the Wright brothers' 1903 Flyer that can be found on the Museum's website.
Read more
1903 Wright Flyer