All Stories

Showing 941 - 950 of 1027
Sat, May 15 2010

Stewardesses, a radical idea

This month marks 80 years of female flight attendants. It's hard to imagine a time without them, but until 1930, airlines employed male stewards. That changed when Ellen Church, a nurse from Iowa, approached Steve Simpson at Boeing Air Transport (later United Airlines) with the radical idea of putting women nurses on airliners. 

Read More about Stewardesses, a radical idea
favorite
America by Air - Pucci Uniform with Helmet
Fri, May 14 2010

I’m Ready for my Close-up Mr. De Mille

In view of Dom Pisano’s blog on the IMAX films, I thought I might offer some comment on what it is like to see yourself five stories tall on the BIG screen

Read More about I’m Ready for my Close-up Mr. De Mille
favorite
Tue, May 11 2010

A Crash Made Famous on TV

May 10 may ring a bell for fans of the 1970s television show The Six Million Dollar Man.  On that day in 1967, a NASA research aircraft, the wingless M2-F2 lifting body, crashed in the California desert. A film clip of the crash opened the popular weekly show about the gravely injured fictional pilot, Steve Austin, played by Lee Majors.

Read More about A Crash Made Famous on TV
favorite
M2-F2 After Crash
Sun, May 9 2010

Is Resistance Futile?

In Star Trek: The Next Generation the intrepid crew of the United Starship Enterprise repeatedly face the Borg, cyborgs intent on assimilating the biological creatures of the universe into their collective consciousness. Their meme, “resistance is futile,” serves as a convenient tagline for this ongoing plot device in the fictional series, but it also may foreshadow a more realistic future for humanity as we reach into space. When considering the far future and the potential for humans to colonize other bodies in the solar system and beyond, perhaps humanity will adapt to the space environment through modifications of the human body like those found on the Borg. This idea was first broached by scientists Manfred E. Clynes and Nathan S. Kline in a 1960 NASA study.

Read More about Is Resistance Futile?
favorite
Sojourner and Astronaut on Mars
Thu, May 6 2010

Following the Hindenburg

The superlatives tend to pile up pretty quickly when it comes to the rigid airship Hindenburg, the pride of the Deutsche Zeppelin-Reederei line...It’s a shame, though, that the Hindenburg is remembered today primarily for its tragic final flight.

Read More about Following the Hindenburg
favorite
Hindenburg Poster
Mon, May 3 2010

IMAX—Not the First, but Close!

When the National Air and Space Museum opened its doors in July 1976, it featured in its theater a film produced specifically for the Museum called To Fly in a large format called IMAX.

Read More about IMAX—Not the First, but Close!
favorite
IMAX Movie To Fly!
Mon, April 26 2010

The Crew of US Airways Flight 1549 to be Presented with the National Air and Space Museum's Trophy Award for Current Achievement

Sometimes seemingly ordinary people become extraordinary by staying remarkably calm and capable in a crisis.  The crew of US Airways Flight 1549 performed exceptionally on January 15, 2009, when their Airbus A320 jetliner became disabled over New York City after flying through a flock of geese moments after they took off from LaGuardia Airport.  Capt. Chesley B. “Sully” Sullenberger and First Officer Jeffrey B. Skiles masterfully guided the powerless aircraft to an emergency “landing” on the Hudson River.

Read More about The Crew of US Airways Flight 1549 to be Presented with the National Air and Space Museum's Trophy Award for Current Achievement
favorite
Crew of  US Airways Flight 1549
Thu, April 22 2010

Christopher C. Kraft, Jr. to be awarded the National Air and Space Museum's Lifetime Achievement Award

On April 28th, we will be awarding the National Air and Space Museum’s Trophy Award for Current and Lifetime Achievement. The Trophy was initiated in 1985 and has been given every year but one since then. This year, the Lifetime Achievement Award will be given to Christopher C. Kraft, Jr., for a lifetime of service to aerospace, especially for his role in defining the responsibilities of Mission Control for human spaceflight at NASA. Anyone who has seen the Hollywood film Apollo 13 knows how crucial the mission controllers were in saving that mission and its crew from disaster. While the filmmakers may have exaggerated a few things, in that regard they were correct. Mission controllers—at first located at Cape Canaveral, later on in Houston—were critical to the success of all the human missions into space, and it was Kraft who determined their roles and responsibilities.

Read More about Christopher C. Kraft, Jr. to be awarded the National Air and Space Museum's Lifetime Achievement Award
favorite
Gene Kranz and Chris Kraft at console
Mon, April 19 2010

Model Students

I teach an exhibition design course as an adjunct professor for the George Washington University’s Museum Studies program.  I tell my students I’ve got the best job in the world: designing exhibitions for the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum. They often ask what you need to know to be an exhibit designer and how they can get there, too.

Read More about Model Students
favorite
Student Banner for the Social Uses of GPS Technology Exhibit
Thu, April 15 2010

A “New Mars” Comes to the National Air and Space Museum

The Exploring the Planets Gallery has been updated to incude scientic exlporation of Mars. See what's new! 

Read More about A “New Mars” Comes to the National Air and Space Museum
favorite
Exploring the Planets Gallery -- Mars Section

Don't Miss Our Latest Stories Learn More