Topic

Astronauts

Showing 1 - 10 of 57
Tue, January 24 2017

Studying Long-Duration Human Spaceflight

A human mission to Mars will take anywhere from two and a half to three years. That is NASA’s best estimate, with each leg of the trip taking six months and including an 18 to 20 month stay on the Red Planet. That does not sound like an extremely long-term prospect until one considers the fact that the world record for the longest single stay in Earth orbit belongs to Soviet cosmonaut and physician Valeri Poliakov at 437 days and 18 hours aboard the Mir space station in 1994-1995. That is less than half the time it would take to complete a mission to Mars.  

Read More about Studying Long-Duration Human Spaceflight
favorite
Mir Cosmonaut Views Discovery
Thu, January 19 2017

Remembering A Hero for the Ages

Captain Eugene Andrew Cernan died Monday, surrounded by his family in Houston, Texas. He was 82 years old. For more than half his life, he was known as the Last Man on the Moon, but he was also a devoted father and husband, a naval aviator and advocate, and a great friend to many. He remains a hero for the ages.

Read More about Remembering A Hero for the Ages
favorite
Gen. Dailey and Capt. Cernan
Tue, January 17 2017

Remembering Capt. Eugene Cernan

“Gene” Cernan will always be remembered as the “last man on the Moon”—at least until the next person walks there. As commander of Apollo 17, the final expedition of that program, he spent three days on the Moon with Harrison “Jack” Schmitt. Yet that is not all he accomplished in a storied astronaut career.

Read More about Remembering Capt. Eugene Cernan
favorite
Gene Cernan in Flight during the Apollo 17 Mission
Wed, January 4 2017

Examining the SLS Rocket with Astronaut Christina Koch

NASA is building a brand new rocket for the future of human spaceflight. Astronaut Christina Koch, who graduated from NASA’s astronaut training program in 2015, helps us examine the Space Launch System rocket in more detail. 

Read More about Examining the SLS Rocket with Astronaut Christina Koch
favorite
SLS Rocket
Tue, December 27 2016

Remembering Piers J. Sellers, Scientist and Astronaut

One of the great honors of working at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum is the opportunity to interact with some of the few humans to orbit the Earth. Earlier in December, we mourned the loss of one of our dearest supporters and friends, Senator John H. Glenn. Now, we have again lost a featured speaker at the Museum, Dr. Piers J. Sellers, who worked at the nearby NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The following stories about working with Sellers are from two Space History Department curators, who found his unique spirit and passion for science inspiring and heartwarming.

Read More about Remembering Piers J. Sellers, Scientist and Astronaut
favorite
Piers Sellers
Fri, December 9 2016

Remembering My Friend and Hero John Glenn

John Glenn died yesterday, after a lifetime of service to his country. He was a Marine aviator and combat veteran of two wars, the first American to orbit the Earth, a United States Senator, and a great friend. After 95 years, his service is finally complete. It is now up to us to celebrate a life well-lived, and to honor his legacy of virtue and valor. Our hearts are heavy, but full of gratitude.

Read More about

Remembering My Friend and Hero John Glenn

favorite
General J.R. Dailey and Senator John Glenn
Fri, November 4 2016

Your Captions: Incoming Call

What’s one way to lighten the mood before being blasted 186 kilometers (116 miles) into Earth orbit? Some humor. On May 5, 1961, Shepard appeared to be keeping the mood light as this photo captures. 

Read More about Your Captions: Incoming Call
favorite
Alan Shepard with Telephone
Fri, October 7 2016

A Quick History of Launch Escape Systems

Blue Origin, Jeff Bezo’s private rocket company, passed an in-flight test of its launch escape system Wednesday—a method of detaching a crew capsule from a launch rocket. The successful test moves Blue Origin one step closer to its goal of carrying tourists into space. How to bring crews safely back to Earth in the event something goes wrong during a launch has always been a concern. Launch escape systems have been engineered into nearly all ventures into space.

Read More about A Quick History of Launch Escape Systems
favorite
Artist Rendering of Launch Escape
Tue, September 20 2016

Interview with Apollo 11 Astronaut Michael Collins

At the Museum we’re fortunate to host many of the nation’s aerospace icons. This was certainly the case earlier this year when Gemini 10 and Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins was on hand for our 2016 John H. Glenn Lecture, Spaceflight: Then, Now, Next.

Read More about Interview with Apollo 11 Astronaut Michael Collins
favorite
Interviewing Apollo Astronaut Michael Collins
Wed, August 31 2016

Catchin’ Zs in Micro-G 

It’s the little things we take for granted here on Earth; things like being able to lie down on a bed and not have it float away, or wake up without suffocating on our own exhaled carbon dioxide. While interning at the Museum, I’ve spent time researching several of those things we take for granted but astronauts in space cannot.

Read More about

Catchin’ Zs in Micro-G 

favorite
Sleeping in Space

Pages

Don't Miss Our Latest Stories Learn More