Showing 11 - 20 of 51
Fri, September 16 2016

From "Computer" to Astronomer: The Role of Women in Astronomy

Long before your laptop computer and the computers that took us to the Moon, there was another type of computer. In the early 20th century, women who made calculations and reduced astronomical data were known as “computers.” The hours were long and the pay was minimal. Their calculations, however, laid important groundwork for future astronomers and led to some of the most important astronomical discoveries.

Read More about From "Computer" to Astronomer: The Role of Women in Astronomy
Phoebe Waterman Haas Ascending Solar Tower
Thu, June 16 2016

Field Report from the Astronomy in Chile Educator Ambassador Program

I’m snatching moments to write this from Chile, sitting on the floor of the airport, or bouncing up winding mountain roads in a van. I’m here as an Astronomy in Chile Educator Ambassador, with eight other ambassadors.

Read More about Field Report from the Astronomy in Chile Educator Ambassador Program
Astronomy education ambassadors stargazing
Thu, April 7 2016

Gravitational Waves Face to Face

On February 11 of this year, when scientists announced that they had detected gravitational waves, I was among the thousands of people who were so excited we couldn’t sit still. This news was literally Earth-shaking! Gravitational waves are ripples in space-time, and they’re created by events like the collision of massive objects, such as black holes. So of course, being an astronomy educator, I took the first opportunity to talk about this news with visitors at the Museum. The day after the announcement, I set up our black holes Discovery Station, which uses a rubber sheet to demonstrate how space-time gets warped by massive objects. I created my own “gravitational waves” by tapping on the rubber sheet to make it vibrate, like ripples on a pond.

Read More about Gravitational Waves Face to Face
Black Holes Discovery Station
Wed, March 23 2016

Women Who Changed the Universe and How We Portray Them

One of the many threads in our Explore the Universe gallery is the changing role of women in astronomy over the past two centuries. In the present gallery, opened in September 2001, we examine how the role of women as astronomers has changed over time from assisting family members to leaders of research teams.

Read More about Women Who Changed the Universe and How We Portray Them
Vera Rubin at the Flagstaff Telescope
Thu, December 31 2015

A Year in Review – 2015

It’s a tall order to sum up the past year at the National Air and Space Museum in a simple list. We’ve hosted astronauts and record breakers, we’ve moved and conserved dozens of artifacts as we transformed the Boeing Milestones of Flight Hall (and discovered some incredible things in the process), and held programs that illuminated the impact of aviation and spaceflight on our everyday lives. Where would I even start? I propose a compromise: I’ll summarize ten of my favorite events of this past year, then I’m relying on you to suggest yours. Did you have an experience at the Museum this past year that should be on our list? We’re asking you to share your favorite Air and Space moments in the comments.

Read More about A Year in Review – 2015
Visit from Chuck Yeager
Sun, December 20 2015

Tips for Telescope Buying

One of the most common questions we get at the Phoebe Waterman Haas Public Observatory is about what kind of telescope to buy, whether for a gift or for personal use. In the height of the holiday shopping, we’re here to help answer that question.  

Read More about Tips for Telescope Buying
Telescopic observing draws young visitors
Tue, December 15 2015

Can you discover Planet X?

The search for a new planet

Read More about Can you discover Planet X?
Fri, November 6 2015

The Day I Helped President Obama Observe the Moon

I’ve done a lot of “cool” things as an educator at this Museum: performed a solar system dance with Miss America, chatted with astronauts, and given people their first awe-inspiring views through a telescope. But I have to say, my most recent experience was truly out of this world. On Monday, October 19, 2015, I participated in the second  Astronomy Night at the White House. This event is designed to get youth excited about astronomy, space exploration, science, and engineering. 

Read More about The Day I Helped President Obama Observe the Moon
President Obama With Telescope
Fri, September 25 2015

Supermoon Eclipse!

You may have heard about the “supermoon eclipse” that will happen this Sunday, September 27. Sounds pretty exciting! But what does it mean? Let’s start with the “supermoon” part. The Moon’s orbit around the Earth is not a perfect circle; it’s an ellipse, which means that the distance between the Moon and the Earth changes over the course of a month. When the Moon is in the part of its orbit that brings it closest to Earth, the perigee, it appears larger in our sky.

Read More about Supermoon Eclipse!
Micromoon vs Supermoon
Mon, April 14 2014

Blood Moon

If you live in North America or western South America, you have a treat in store for you tonight or early tomorrow morning: a total lunar eclipse! If you live elsewhere in the world, or if it’s cloudy in your location – as it probably will be tonight at our location in Washington, DC – you can still see the eclipse online.  Several websites will host live streams.  Some of their locations will be clouded out, so we recommend that you search for “lunar eclipse live stream” and browse the results.  You can also participate in a live web chat during the eclipse with NASA astronomers.

Read More about Blood Moon
Lunar Eclipse Diagram


Don't Miss Our Latest Stories Learn More