Topic

Aviators

Showing 41 - 50 of 55
Wed, August 22 2012

Tuskegee Red Lands at Air and Space!

During World War II, a group of young, enthusiastic and skilled African American men pressed the limits of flight and the boundaries of racial inequality by becoming Army Air Forces pilots. Most of these pilots trained at Moton Field in Tuskegee, Alabama.

Read More about Tuskegee Red Lands at Air and Space!
favorite
Tuskegee Crape Myrtle
Thu, March 1 2012

The Pilot as Hero in the Aviation Film Genre

The relationship between film, history, and mass culture is especially intriguing when we examine the correspondences between the representation of pilot-heroes in film and public perceptions of aviation. These connections are applicable during the heyday of the aviation genre film—the interwar years and WWII.

Read More about The Pilot as Hero in the Aviation Film Genre
favorite
Thu, February 9 2012

Red Tail Stories

I would like to think that I’ve always known the inspirational story of the Tuskegee Airmen—the groundbreaking pilots of the 332nd Fighter Group and the 477th Bombardment Group.

Read More about Red Tail Stories
favorite
Tuskegee Airmen with Mae Jemison
Thu, January 5 2012

Hollywood’s Representation of Naval Aviation: Frank W. “Spig” Wead and John Ford’s "The Wings of Eagles" (1957)

During the recently completed centennial of naval aviation (2011), there were many and varied tributes to the factual history of naval aviation. Nevertheless, we cannot forget that public perception of the armed forces is also a strong historical consideration.

Read More about Hollywood’s Representation of Naval Aviation: Frank W. “Spig” Wead and John Ford’s "The Wings of Eagles" (1957)
favorite
Hollywood’s Representation of Naval Aviation: Frank W. “Spig” Wead and John Ford’s The Wings of Eagles (1957)
Sat, December 17 2011

WINGS: From the Wright Brothers to the Present

Airplane designers will tell you that the wing is the heart of an airplane. For conventional airplanes, it provides most of the lift generated by the airplane; the fuselage and tail contribute only a few percent of the overall lift of the airplane.

Read More about WINGS: From the Wright Brothers to the Present
favorite
Otto Lilienthal
Sun, October 23 2011

The Tomboy of the Air

Blogs across the Smithsonian will give an inside look at the Institution’s archival collections and practices during a month long blogathon in celebration of October’s American Archives Month. See additional posts from our other participating blogs, as well as related events and resources, on the Smithsonian’s Archives Month website .

Read More about The Tomboy of the Air
favorite
Blanche Stuart Scott
Sat, July 30 2011

Tuskegee Bird Flies North

During the past two years, it has been my privilege to work closely with the curatorial staff of the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) to locate an aircraft with a lineage tied directly to the Tuskegee Airmen. We were fortunate enough to accomplish the mission that will culminate in the acquisition of a PT-13 Stearman that flew at Moton Field, Alabama, during WW II—the home of the Tuskegee Airmen.

Read More about Tuskegee Bird Flies North
favorite
PT-13 Stearman
Tue, January 18 2011

Eugene Ely and the Birth of Naval Aviation—January 18, 1911

In 1909, military aviation began with the purchase of the Wright Military Flyer by the U.S. Army.   The Navy sprouted wings two years later in 1911 with a number of significant firsts.  The first U.S Navy officers were trained to fly, the Navy purchased its first airplanes from Glenn Curtiss and the Wrights, and sites for naval aircraft operations were established at Annapolis, Md., and at North Island, San Diego, Ca.  But the most dramatic demonstration that the skies and the seas were now joined occurred on January 18, 1911, when Eugene Burton Ely made the first successful landing and take-off from a naval vessel.

Read More about Eugene Ely and the Birth of Naval Aviation—January 18, 1911
favorite
Eugene Ely
Tue, October 12 2010

Eugene J. Bullard

October 12, 2010, marks the forty-ninth anniversary of the death of Eugene Jacques Bullard at the age of 67. Bullard is considered to be the first African-American military pilot to fly in combat, and the only African-American pilot in World War I.

Read More about Eugene J. Bullard
favorite
Portrait of Eugene Bullard
Thu, July 22 2010

Wiley Post

July 22, 2010, marks the 77th anniversary of Wiley Post’s 1933 solo flight around the world in the Lockheed 5C Vega Winnie Mae. This record-breaking flight demonstrated several significant aviation technologies. It used two relatively new aeronautical devices—an autopilot and a radio direction finder.

Read More about Wiley Post
favorite
Wiley Post

Pages

Don't Miss Our Latest Stories Learn More