Topic

Equipment

Showing 1 - 10 of 16
Thu, January 7 2016

Apollo Inflight Exerciser

Here on Earth, everyone knows exercise is important, but in the weightless environment of space, it’s really important.

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Apollo Inflight Exerciser
Tue, November 17 2015

The Tizard Mission – 75 Years of Anglo-American Technical Alliance

The Allied Victory in World War II was one of cooperation, not just on the battlefield, but in the laboratory. Microwave radar, jet propulsion, gyroscopic gunsights, and even penicillin were key innovations critical to American military success.

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Indicator, Radar Interrogator, BC-929-A, AN/APN-2 Rebecca Mk IIA
Thu, October 29 2015

Halloween Horrors of the Air: 13 Terrifying Images of Aero Fashion

From witches to winged demons, humanity has long harbored a horror of airborne denizens. Even when we ventured forth into the heavens without supernatural support, we sometimes adopted some truly terrifying attire.

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Mannequin Models Early Flight Mask
Sat, October 17 2015

Octave Chanute and the Richard Anemometer

Many people, if not most, have never heard of Octave Chanute or know what an anemometer is, but the man and the instrument both played an important part in Orville and Wilbur Wright’s aeronautical experiments. First, some background on Chanute. Octave Chanute was a Paris-born civil engineer in the United States who played a significant role in the burgeoning field of heavier-than-air flight in the late nineteenth century.

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Richard Anemometer
Mon, August 31 2015

Duct Tape Auto Repair on the Moon

When most people think of emergency fixes in space, the first incident that comes to mind is the famous Apollo 13 mission. The astronauts fashioned duct tape and surplus materials into air filtration canisters in the lunar module to keep all three astronauts alive for the entire trip home.

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Apollo 17 LRV
Tue, February 17 2015

WWI U.S. Army Protective Helmet Used by American Rocket Society

What does a piece of World War I Army surplus have to do with early rocketry?

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American Rocket Society Helmet
Thu, January 8 2015

Hands and Gloves in Space

There is a common saying that the hands are where the mind meets the world. In space there is no direct contact between the mind and the world. This transaction is mediated by the artificial structures called gloves.

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Armstrong's Glove Dip Forms
Wed, November 19 2014

Seeing Apollo 12

On November 19, 1969, 45 years ago and three short months after the landing of Apollo 11, Commander Charles “Pete” Conrad and Lunar Module Pilot Alan Bean landed their lunar module “Intrepid” on the Ocean of Storms, just walking distance from the Surveyor III spacecraft. Their near pinpoint landing showed that Moon landings could continue, and with such accuracy that specific objects could be targeted for research. 

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Charles Conrad Jr. examines Surveyor III (3)
Wed, April 23 2014

Repairing Hubble

Soon after the Hubble Space Telescope was launched in 1990, images and data from its instruments revealed that its main mirror was optically flawed. It suffered from spherical aberration—not all portions of the mirror focused to the same point. The mirror’s shape was off by less than 1/50th the thickness of a human hair, but this tiny flaw proved devastating to the quality of the Hubble’s images and to the efficiency of all of its instruments.

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Deployment of Hubble Space Telescope
Mon, February 24 2014

Twenty Years of GPS and Instrument Flight

On February 16, 1994, a significant milestone in American aviation occurred when the Federal Aviation Administration certified the first GPS unit for use in IFR (Instrument Flight Rules) operations. Twenty years later, GPS has become the dominant form of en route navigation as well as the primary technology for guiding aircraft in low-visibility approaches to landing.

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GPS 155

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