Topic

Exploration

Showing 41 - 50 of 99
Tue, August 16 2016

Food & Flight: Harrison Schmitt’s Chili

Harrison “Jack” Schmitt was the first and last geologist to visit the Moon. Below is his secret chili recipe, served best with a side of tortilla chips and some space history. We can’t help with the chips, but we can tell you a little about this chili-making astronaut.

Read More about Food & Flight: Harrison Schmitt’s Chili
favorite
Man on the Moon
Fri, August 12 2016

The Perseids Light Up the Sky

The annual Perseid meteor shower is at its peak (August 11-13). Meteor showers occur when the Earth’s orbit around the Sun takes us through a debris field, which is often a trail of cosmic dust left behind by a comet.

Read More about The Perseids Light Up the Sky
favorite
Perseid Meteor Shower
Thu, August 11 2016

August 11, 1978: Crossing the Atlantic in a Balloon

On this day in 1978, Ben Abruzzo, Maxie Anderson, and Larry Newman took off from Presque Isle, Maine in the gas balloon Double Eagle II in an attempt to cross the Atlantic. The successful crossing took 137 hours, 6 minutes and covered 5,021 kilometers (3,120 miles) landing in a wheat field near Miserey, France.

Read More about August 11, 1978: Crossing the Atlantic in a Balloon
favorite
Double Eagle II Over Farmland during its Transatlantic Flight
Fri, August 5 2016

On This Day: Juno Began Journey to Jupiter

On this day in 2011, Juno began its journey to Jupiter. After an almost five-year journey, the spacecraft successfully entered Jupiter’s orbit, and has since been investigating the planet's origins, interior structure, deep atmosphere and magnetosphere.

Read More about On This Day: Juno Began Journey to Jupiter
favorite
An artist's rendering showing Juno spacecraft
Thu, August 4 2016

On This Day: Phoenix Launched to Mars 

On this day in 2007, the Mars Phoenix lander was launched from a Delta II at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida. Phoenix flew to a site in the far northern plains of Mars where it analyzed components of the surface, subsurface, and atmosphere.

Read More about

On This Day: Phoenix Launched to Mars 

favorite
Phoenix Mars Lander Launches
Wed, August 3 2016

On This Day: First Spacewalk Under a Shuttle

On this day in 2005, Discovery astronaut Stephen K. Robinson became the first person to do a spacewalk underneath a space shuttle orbiter.

Read More about On This Day: First Spacewalk Under a Shuttle
favorite
Space Shuttle Discovery's Underside
Mon, July 25 2016

Exploring Colorado’s Great Sand Dunes: A Towering Red Planet Analog

As the National Air and Space Museum’s annual Mars Day! celebration approaches, we look to a recent research trip taken by a Smithsonian Summer Intern to investigate the similarities between some of Earth’s most amazing dunes and those found on the ruddy surface of Mars.

Read More about Exploring Colorado’s Great Sand Dunes: A Towering Red Planet Analog
favorite
Measuring a Megaripple
Fri, July 15 2016

Launching an Apollo 11 Anniversary Celebration

“We know it will be a good ride,” Astronaut Neil Armstrong said. He was responding to well wishes from the NASA launch operations manager just 15 seconds before automatic sequence. And he was right. It was a good ride.

Read More about Launching an Apollo 11 Anniversary Celebration
favorite
Apollo 11 Clears the Launch Tower
Thu, June 16 2016

Capturing the Early History of Aeronautics

Among the treasures found within the special collections of the DeWitt Clinton Ramsey Room, a branch of the Smithsonian Libraries located at the National Air and Space Museum, is a collection of oversized scrapbooks with an interesting and complicated history. Originally bound in one volume, William Upcott’s Scrapbook of Early Aeronautica captures the history of lighter-than-air aircraft and aeronautics from 1783 to the 1840s through a rich collection of newspaper clippings, articles, illustrations, and letters.

Read More about Capturing the Early History of Aeronautics
favorite
Page from the Scrapbook of Early Aeronautica
Thu, June 16 2016

Pioneering Aerial Archeology by Charles and Anne Lindbergh

On October 7, 1929, Anne Morrow Lindbergh gazed out the window of a Sikorsky S-38 flying boat, entranced by the view before her: gleaming stone structures only recently freed from the thick tropical vegetation of the Yucatan peninsula in Mexico—Chichén Itzá, a remnant of the Mayan civilization that thrived there between 750 and 1200 AD. Her husband Charles A. Lindbergh piloted the aircraft that skimmed just above the ruins and treetop canopy.

Read More about Pioneering Aerial Archeology by Charles and Anne Lindbergh
favorite
Charles and Anne Lindbergh in France

Pages

Don't Miss Our Latest Stories Learn More