Topic

Exploration

Showing 71 - 80 of 99
Tue, April 23 2013

The Abbreviated History of a Scientist (Namely, Myself)

My first word was JET, since we lived near an Air Force base and experienced sonic booms on a regular basis. My fascination with the heavens took off from there. Growing up, my family went camping and backpacking a lot, and one of my clearest memories of that time is looking up at a dark, dark sky and pointing out satellites to each other, those little moving points of light that are sometimes so faint I could only see them in my peripheral vision.

Read More about The Abbreviated History of a Scientist (Namely, Myself)
favorite
Michelle Selvans
Tue, February 26 2013

Vulcan? But that’s not logical…

The news that “Vulcan” topped the poll results taken by the SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) Institute in Mountain View, California as a possible name for one of the two tiny moons newly discovered to be orbiting Pluto has gotten quite a bit of press this week. In 2012, Mark Showalter of SETI, working with scientists on the New Horizons mission sending a probe to Pluto, found a tiny fifth moon orbiting the icy world.

Read More about Vulcan? But that’s not logical…
favorite
Tue, February 12 2013

Amelia Earhart and the Profession of Air Navigation

The recent seventy-fifth anniversary of the disappearance of Amelia Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan, stirred up considerable media attention – particularly in light of another expedition to the South Pacific in the hopes of solving the mystery. While the fate of Earhart has enthralled the public since 1937, the story of how Earhart figures into the larger history of air navigation and long-distance flying is often overlooked.  

Read More about Amelia Earhart and the Profession of Air Navigation
favorite
Amelia Earhart
Tue, January 15 2013

Reflections on "Explore the Universe" 2001-2012

One of the jokes I inherited from my student years is the final exam question "Describe the Universe" which was followed by "and give two examples."

Read More about Reflections on "Explore the Universe" 2001-2012
favorite
Magellanic Clouds
Thu, November 22 2012

This Pie is out of this World

It’s said that “art imitates life,” but how about baked goods imitating geologic formations!

Read More about This Pie is out of this World
favorite
Goethe Pie Tectonic Ghost Craters
Thu, October 18 2012

Investigating the Apollo Valley

In July, I joined a team from Johnson Space Center and elsewhere in investigating the geology of Apollo Valley with rover-deployed scientific instruments. Apollo Valley is a former 1960s Apollo-era astronaut training site at 3,505 meters (11,500 feet) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The project was funded by NASA's Moon and Mars Analog Mission Activities Program, which funds projects that simulate scientific, robotic, and human aspects of exploring the Moon and Mars, with the goal of designing the most effective, efficient, and well-integrated future missions. 

Read More about Investigating the Apollo Valley
favorite
Apollo Valley, Mauna Kea, Hawaii
Sat, August 25 2012

Remembering Neil Armstrong

I first heard the sad news while having a late lunch with friends at a seafood restaurant on the water in Annapolis, Maryland.

Read More about Remembering Neil Armstrong
favorite
Apollo 11 Mission image - Neil A. Armstrong inside the Lunar Module after E
Mon, June 4 2012

Why should you care about the Transit of Venus?

Astronomy enthusiasts around the world are gearing up for Tuesday’s celestial show: the transit of Venus across the face of the Sun.  The small black dot of Venus, silhouetted against the bright Sun, will be visible with safe solar telescopes and, to those with especially good vision, with the naked eye when protected by eclipse glasses.

Read More about Why should you care about the Transit of Venus?
favorite
Why should you care about the Transit of Venus?
Wed, May 16 2012

Scratching Beneath the Surface

What's inside a planet? What instruments do scientists use to figure it out? And what clues does a planet's surface give us? On Saturday, April 21, Lisa Walsh and I, scientists from the Museum's Center for Earth and Planetary Studies, invited visitors to the National Air and Space Museum's Explore the Universe Family Day to think about these questions, through two hands-on activities relating to our research into tectonics on Mercury.

Read More about Scratching Beneath the Surface
favorite
Explore the Universe Family Day
Wed, April 4 2012

Bringing Spaceflight Down to Earth

Having grown up less than 90 minutes away from the famous Cedar Point amusement park in Sandusky, Ohio, I got the chance at least a few times each summer to see an IMAX movie. I remember the packed seats for the pre-show, everyone clamoring for the best seats right in the middle, but everyone was usually just happy to be escaping the heat for the air conditioned theater. When The Dream Is Alive was released in June 1985, I was just old enough to ride those massive roller coasters, but seeing IMAX films at Cedar Point really left an impression on me: a big impression. Seeing those sweeping views of Earth and space on a gigantic screen made spaceflight seem so real, and utterly amazing.

Read More about Bringing Spaceflight Down to Earth
favorite
Astronaut Carl E. Walz with an IMAX Camera

Pages

Don't Miss Our Latest Stories Learn More