Topic

Restoration

Showing 11 - 20 of 30
Tue, March 4 2014

Horten H IX V3 “Bat-Wing Ship,” March 2014 Update

Conservator Lauren Horelick, Post-Graduate Conservation Fellows Anna Weiss and Peter McElhinney, and retired treatment artisan Karl Heinzel continue to prepare the Horten jet wing to move to the Mary Baker Engen Restoration Hangar at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, VA.

Read More about Horten H IX V3 “Bat-Wing Ship,” March 2014 Update
favorite
Thu, January 23 2014

Restoring the Museum’s “Battling Beast”: The Curtiss SB2C-5 Helldiver

On Friday, March 14, 2014, the Museum will put on display its latest restored aircraft, a Curtiss SB2C-5 Helldiver, at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center. For those of you attending the Center’s Open House on Saturday, January 25, you will get a chance to tour the Mary Baker Engen Restoration Hangar and see some of the work-in-progress firsthand  (note that the fuselage will not be on view). In anticipation of those events, I would like to share with you some aspects of my work on our example of the famous American World War II dive bomber.

Read More about Restoring the Museum’s “Battling Beast”: The Curtiss SB2C-5 Helldiver
favorite
Thu, December 5 2013

Horten H IX V3 “Bat-Wing Ship,” November 2013 Update

Led by object conservator and project leader Lauren Horelick, the National Air and Space Museum staff continues preparing the Horten IX V3 center section to move early in January (weather and roads permitting) to the Mary Baker Engen Restoration Hangar at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center where it will eventually be joined to the outer wing panels that are already displayed in the hangar.

Read More about Horten H IX V3 “Bat-Wing Ship,” November 2013 Update
favorite
Wed, July 24 2013

Spiral Threads of Corrosion Overtake an Antenna Drive

One of the primary objectives in the Museum’s previous collection surveys has been to identify artifacts which are actively deteriorating and require stabilizing treatments prior to being relocated to the new storage facility at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia. These artifacts with active corrosion, mold contamination, hazardous materials, and physical insecurities were set aside for a team of three contract conservators to perform specialized treatments.

Read More about Spiral Threads of Corrosion Overtake an Antenna Drive
favorite
Tue, March 12 2013

Preserving and Displaying the “Bat-Wing Ship” - March Update

Waiting for an update on the conservation and restoration of our Horten H IX V3 "Bat-wing Ship?"

Read More about Preserving and Displaying the “Bat-Wing Ship” - March Update
favorite
Thu, February 7 2013

Where There is Wool, There is a Way

My coworkers and I are fortunate: every day, we get to touch pieces of history that few others ever lay hands on and seldom see. Why are we so privileged? We are helping to move some of the National Air and Space Museum’s collections from their previous storage site to new facilities at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia.

Read More about Where There is Wool, There is a Way
favorite
Fri, June 24 2011

Preserving and Displaying the “Bat-Wing Ship”

Early in June, staff of the Paul E. Garber Preservation, Restoration and Storage Facility slowly and carefully moved the center section of the Horten H IX V3 all-wing jet fighter from storage into the restoration and preservation shop. 

Read More about Preserving and Displaying the “Bat-Wing Ship”
favorite
Tue, April 19 2011

The Real Wright Flyer

Things such as the Hope Diamond, the Star Spangled Banner, the Lansdowne portrait of George Washington, and Charles Lindbergh’s Spirit of St. Louis airplane are good examples—one-of-a-kind items, familiar to all, and widely known to reside at the Smithsonian.  Also in this subset of signature objects is one of the most significant in the entire Smithsonian collection—the Wright Flyer, the world’s first airplane.

Read More about The Real Wright Flyer
favorite
Tue, March 15 2011

Airplanes and Overpasses

As we begin to take occupancy of our new home in the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center’s new wing, and begin the process of outfitting the Mary Baker Engen Restoration Hangar, we are faced with the daunting task of moving all of our equipment into the new spaces and setting up an environment which will be favorable to the preservation and restoration of our priceless artifacts for decades to come. This is likely to be a lengthy process but we have begun to deliver selected artifacts so that when the viewing area becomes accessible, visitors will be able to see examples of our gems in the rough. Each of these aircraft has been in storage at the Paul E. Garber Facility in Suitland, Maryland for years, where the Museum's restoration work had taken place for decades.  These aircraft are seldom seen by the public, and are all in need of preservation or restoration treatments.

Read More about Airplanes and Overpasses
favorite
Wed, November 24 2010

First Aircraft Moves Into Udvar-Hazy Center Restoration Hangar

This week, the Museum moved its first aircraft into the Mary Baker Engen Restoration Hanger in the new wing of the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, VA. The aircraft is the Curtiss SB2C Helldiver, the same type of aircraft flown by former Museum director, Don Engen during World War II.

Read More about First Aircraft Moves Into Udvar-Hazy Center Restoration Hangar
favorite

Pages