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Mon, June 3 2019

D-Day and the Douglas C-47

In the early morning of June 6, 1944, thousands of soldiers, sailors, and airmen readied themselves for D-Day of Operation Overlord. For several divisions of American and British soldiers, the invasion had actually begun the night before on board Douglas C-47s.

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Sun, June 2 2019

D-Day: Aerial Photography in Action

D-Day was the boldest, riskiest and most anticipated operation of the entire World War II European Theater. To succeed in the Allied invasion of France, Allied commanders needed detailed information about prospective French coastal landing sites and surrounding areas. That's where aerial photography comes in.

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D-Day: Aerial Photography in Action

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Fri, May 31 2019

Preserving Flak-Bait: Saving Doped Fabric

The Martin B-26B Marauder Flak-Bait, an iconic artifact of World War II is undergoing artifact treatment in the Museum’s Mary Baker Engen Restoration Hangar. In this first in a series of blogs about the conservation of the aircraft, we explore the preservation of the doped fabric on the rudder.

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Preserving Flak-Bait: Saving Doped Fabric

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Thu, May 23 2019

AirSpace Season 2|Ep.6
Help!

Some of the world’s best pilots are the ones you hope never to see. In this episode, we’re talking about air rescue.

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AirSpace Season 2|Ep.6
Help!

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Mon, May 20 2019

A Year of Anniversaries for Record-Setter Bill Odom and the Beechcraft 35 Bonanza

2019 marks the 70th anniversary of two long-distance light plane records by William P. Odom. Those records were set in the Museum’s Beechcraft 35 Bonanza, which is displayed at our Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center. In addition, it is also the 100th anniversary of William Paul Odom’s birth, on October 21, 1919, in Porum, Oklahoma.

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A Year of Anniversaries for Record-Setter Bill Odom and the Beechcraft 35 Bonanza

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Mon, May 13 2019

A Shrinking, Tectonically Active Moon

Recent research conducted by the Lunar Reconnaisance Orbiter (LRO) team indicates that moonquakes on our Moon were caused by active lunar faults -- meaning that the Moon is currently tectonically active and that the moonquakes are a result of the shrinking Moon. 

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Thu, May 9 2019

AirSpace Season 2|Ep.5
Big Iron

Scientists believe our planet has a metallic inner core, but we can’t exactly crack it open and check. Instead, NASA is sending a mission to an asteroid named Psyche, which appears to be a nickel-iron planetary core a lot like the one at the center of the Earth.

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AirSpace Season 2|Ep.5
Big Iron

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Thu, May 2 2019

Days of Remembrance: World War I Aviator Dezsö Becker

May 2, 2019, marks the United States’ Days of Remembrance, the nation’s annual commemoration of the Holocaust.  Today the National Air and Space Museum remembers Dezsö Becker, a Hungarian aviator who served in World War I and died in the Buchenwald Concentration Camp in January 1945.

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Fri, April 26 2019

A High-Flying Spy Plane

Until recently, a Lockheed U-2, one of the most successful intelligence-gathering aircraft every produced, was on display in the Museum's Looking at Earth gallery. The U-2 was designed by a team led by Clarence L. "Kelly" Johnson at the famous Lockheed 'Skunk Works" in Palmdale, California. The jet played a crucial role during the tense years of the Cold War.

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Thu, April 25 2019

AirSpace Season 2|Ep.4
AirSpace Live at SXSW

In this special episode recorded at SXSW, Emily, Matt, and Nick recount stories of failure and how they’ve inspired a whole lot of success in science and space exploration

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AirSpace Season 2|Ep.4
AirSpace Live at SXSW

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