A young blond child wears an astronaut costume.  The child has taken their helmet off and is smiling.

Plan Your Visit

1. Before you come:

  • Print the floor plan of the museum.
  • Prepare for the security screening to enter the building by minimizing bags and reviewing the list of prohibited itemsWe encourage you to limit the number of personal belongings and bags you bring into our facilities as they will be subject to a thorough search. Limiting the items you bring will increase your speed through security checkpoints, helping us all maintain a safe social distance. Please note that we do not offer coat or bag storage. 
  • If sick, stay home. We’re asking all visitors who are sick or feel unwell to please stay home. If you are at increased risk of severe illness, you may also want to consider staying home. 
  • Masks are not required to visit the Museum. While it will not be required, all visitors who feel more comfortable wearing a face mask during their visit are encouraged to do so.

2. While you’re here:

  • Practice social distancing. Please maintain a safe social distance of six feet or more between households or groups at all times. There will be social-distancing signage and directions throughout our facilities. 
  • Please wash and sanitize hands frequently during your visit and practice good hygiene. Hand-sanitizing stations will be available throughout the museum. 
  • If you need help during your visit, speak to a staff member near the front entrance.
  • Enjoy your visit. Explore the list of exhibitions and what activities are and are not available to plan your visit. 
  • Visit the store. The museum store is only accepting cashless payments at this time.
  • Masks are not required to visit the Museum. While it will not be required, all visitors who feel more comfortable wearing a face mask during their visit are encouraged to do so.

3. When you leave:

    The Boeing Aviation Hangar at the Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia.

    The McDonnell Space Hangar, featuring the Space Shuttle Discovery surrounded by other museum artifacts.

    Guests view the displays in the James S. McDonnell Space Hangar. 

    Children ask questions with Amanda Elliott working remotely at the Visitors Welcome desk.

    The Sopwith Camel is among the most significant and famous World War I aircraft. During World War I, Camels downed 1,294 enemy aircraft, which was more than any other Allied fighter. The cowling over the two Vickers machine guns created a distinctive ?hump,? making the name Camel a natural choice. Highlighted in this image are the propellers and engine of the Sopwith F.1 Camel.

    Concorde on display in the Boeing Aviation Hangar at the National Air and Space Museum's Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center.

    The Bucker Bu-133C Jungmeister, hanging upside down to demonstrate one of the many aerobatic maneuvers it performed during its time as a thrilling air show performer. The photo of the Boeing Aviation Hangar at the Udvar-Hazy Center also shows the red, white and blue de Havilland-Canada DHC-1A Chipmunk, Pennzoil Special; the second Learjet ever built, hanging to the left; the Global Flyer hanging in the read center; the first Air France Concorde on the floor on the left and the Boeing Stratoliner on the right.

    Shown in this 2006 photo are two of the most popular artifacts at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center: the Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird (foreground) in the Boeing Aviation Hangar and Space Shuttle Enterprise (background) in the James S. McDonnell Space Hangar. Enterprise was replaced by Space Shuttle Discovery in 2012.

    The glass and steel architecture of the National Air and Space Museum's Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center looking beautiful in the reflective glow of a Virginia sunset.

Contact

Phone: 703-572-4118
Email: NASM-VisitorServices@si.edu

Smithsonian information specialists are also available Monday through Saturday from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm.
Email: info@si.edu