Display Status This object is not on display at the National Air and Space Museum. It is either on loan or in storage.

Charles Edward Taylor (1868-1956), sometimes referred to as 'the first airplane mechanic,' worked intermittently from 1901 to 1920 for Orville and Wilbur Wright and the Wright-Martin Company. Born in Nebraska in 1868, Taylor built the first engine that powered an airplane in flight, a little four-cylnder, gasoline engine which was used in the Wright 1903 Flyer at Kitty Hawk on December 17, 1903.

Identifier

NASM.1987.0006

Creator

Taylor, Charles Edward, 1868-1956

Date

1928-1966

bulk 1928-1956

Provenance

Charles Edward Taylor, II, Gift, 1986, 1987-0006, NASM

Extent

0.23 Cubic feet ((1 slim legal document box))

Restrictions

No restrictions on access

Type

Collection descriptions

Archival materials

Correspondence

Biographies

Scope and Contents

This accession includes Taylor's correspondence with his son, Rueben W. Taylor, (1928-1948), and the Garrison Machine Works, (1953-1956), makers of gears used in the Wright flyer engines. The letters to Rueben Taylor are originals, while the Garrison Machine Works correspondence are mostly xerox copies. Also included are brief biographical sketches of Taylor.

Genre/Form

Correspondence

Biographies

Rights

Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests

Names

Wright-Martin Aircraft Co.

Taylor, Charles Edward, 1868-1956

Wright, Orville, 1871-1948

Wright, Wilbur, 1867-1912

Topics Airplanes -- Motors
Airplanes -- Design and construction
Airplanes
Wright (Brothers) 1903 Flyer
Aeronautics -- 1903-1916
Aeronautics

Archival Repository

National Air and Space Museum Archives

Finding Aid Online Finding Aid