Assembly, Bioinstrumentation, Skylab 3

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    Assembly, Bioinstrumentation, Skylab 3

    Tan fabric belt with pouches containing small biomedical devices; sheathed cable assembly; missing electrode harness.

    1 of 3

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    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

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    Assembly, Bioinstrumentation, Skylab 3

    Tan fabric belt with pouches containing small biomedical devices; sheathed cable assembly; missing electrode harness.

    2 of 3

    Usage Conditions Apply

    There are restrictions for re-using this media. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

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    Assembly, Bioinstrumentation, Skylab 3

    Tan fabric belt with pouches containing small biomedical devices; sheathed cable assembly; missing electrode harness.

    3 of 3

An astronaut wore this set of small biomedical devices to monitor his condition during launch, extravehicular activity, return, and occasional checkups during the Skylab 3 mission. The biobelt and harness assembly included an electrocardiograph to record heartbeat, a cardiotachometer for heart rate, an impedance pneumograph for respiration rate, and two sets of electrodes. The electrodes attached to the crewmember's chest and plugged into the instruments on the biobelt, which was snapped onto an undergarment. The cable bundle from the biobelt connected to a communications cable for data transmission to medical staff on the ground. The biobelt supported the Skylab goal of understanding the body's response to long-duration spaceflight.

NASA transferred this the Museum in 1977.