Bensen B-6 Gyroglider

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    Bensen B-6 Gyroglider

    In 1954, Igor Bensen designed this Gyroglider as a means to introduce teenagers and aviation enthusiasts to the thrills of flight with minimal cost. The pilot relied on an automobile or other motorized vehicle to pull the aircraft aloft. The movement of air through the rotor disc caused the blades to autorotate, which provided lift. The B-6 Gyroglider needed a relative wind speed of 32 kph (20 mph) to remain airborne.

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    Usage Conditions Apply

    There are restrictions for re-using this media. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Bensen B-6 Gyroglider

    In 1954, Igor Bensen designed this Gyroglider as a means to introduce teenagers and aviation enthusiasts to the thrills of flight with minimal cost. The pilot relied on an automobile or other motorized vehicle to pull the aircraft aloft. The movement of air through the rotor disc caused the blades to autorotate, which provided lift. The B-6 Gyroglider needed a relative wind speed of 32 kph (20 mph) to remain airborne.

    2 of 2

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This object is on display in the Boeing Aviation Hangar at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, VA.

Boeing Aviation Hangar

In 1954, Igor Bensen designed this Gyroglider as a means to introduce teenagers and aviation enthusiasts to the thrills of flight with minimal cost. The pilot relied on an automobile or other motorized vehicle to pull the aircraft aloft. The movement of air through the rotor disc caused the blades to autorotate, which provided lift. The B-6 Gyroglider needed a relative wind speed of 32 kph (20 mph) to remain airborne.

Kit plans and critical parts for the production B-7 version were available, starting at $100. The kit included options for either skids or wheeled landing gear, which required steel-soled shoes for braking. Towed aircraft did not require certification unless the pilot detached from the towrope in flight. Bensen later modified a B-7 Gyroglider with a motor, resulting in his highly successful Gyrocopter line.