Boeing 307 Stratoliner "Clipper Flying Cloud"

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    CCO - Creative Commons (CC0 1.0)

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    CCO - Creative Commons (CC0 1.0)

    This media is in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). You can copy, modify, and distribute this work without contacting the Smithsonian. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

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    Boeing 307 Stratoliner "Clipper Flying Cloud"

    First flown in late 1938, the Boeing 307 was the first airliner with a pressurized fuselage. It could carry 33 passengers in great comfort and cruise at 6,096 meters (20,000 feet), while maintaining a cabin pressure of 2,438 meters (8,000 feet). This enabled the Stratoliner to fly above most bad weather, thereby providing a faster and smoother ride.
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    Boeing 307 Stratoliner Cockpit

    This photo shows the cockpit of the Museum's Boeing 307 Stratoliner

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    Boeing 307 Stratoliner

    First flown in late 1938, the Boeing 307 was the first airliner with a pressurized fuselage. It could carry 33 passengers in great comfort and cruise at 6,096 meters (20,000 feet), while maintaining a cabin pressure of 2,438 meters (8,000 feet). This enabled the Stratoliner to fly above most bad weather, thereby providing a faster and smoother ride.

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    Boeing 307 Stratoliner

    First flown in late 1938, the Boeing 307 was the first airliner with a pressurized fuselage. It could carry 33 passengers in great comfort and cruise at 6,096 meters (20,000 feet), while maintaining a cabin pressure of 2,438 meters (8,000 feet). This enabled the Stratoliner to fly above most bad weather, thereby providing a faster and smoother ride.

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    Boeing 307 Stratoliner

    First flown in late 1938, the Boeing 307 was the first airliner with a pressurized fuselage. It could carry 33 passengers in great comfort and cruise at 6,096 meters (20,000 feet), while maintaining a cabin pressure of 2,438 meters (8,000 feet). This enabled the Stratoliner to fly above most bad weather, thereby providing a faster and smoother ride.

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    Boeing 307 Stratoliner Nose

    First flown in late 1938, the Boeing 307 was the first airliner with a pressurized fuselage. It could carry 33 passengers in great comfort and cruise at 6,096 meters (20,000 feet), while maintaining a cabin pressure of 2,438 meters (8,000 feet). This enabled the Stratoliner to fly above most bad weather, thereby providing a faster and smoother ride. Highlighted in this image is the nose of the Boeing 307 Stratoliner.

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    Boeing 307 Stratoliner "Clipper Flying Cloud" at the Udvar-Hazy Center

    First flown in late 1938, the Boeing 307 was the first airliner with a pressurized fuselage. It could carry 33 passengers in great comfort and cruise at 6,096 meters (20,000 feet), while maintaining a cabin pressure of 2,438 meters (8,000 feet). This enabled the Stratoliner to fly above most bad weather, thereby providing a faster and smoother ride.

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    Boeing S-307 Stratoliner Arrives at Washington Dulles Airport

    The National Air and Space Museum's Boeing S-307 Stratoliner arriving at Washington Dulles International Airport on its last flight, Aug. 6, 2003. The sole surviving Stratoliner, the first pressurized passenger airplane, will be on display when the museum's Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center opens to the public Dec. 15, 2003.
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    Boeing S-307 Stratoliner Cockpit

    A view of the cockpit of the sole surviving Boeing S-307 Stratoliner after the airplane arrived at Washington Dulles International Airport on its last flight, Aug. 6, 2003. The airplane is now on permanent display at the National Air and Space Museum's Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center.
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    Boeing S-307 Stratoliner Landing

    Beoing S-307 Stratoliner arriving at Washington Dulles International Airport on Aug. 6, 2003. The airplane has been in the museum's collection since 1972. It will be on display at the new Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, which opens to the public Dec. 15, 2003.
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    Boeing 307 Stratoliner "Clipper Flying Cloud" at the Udvar-Hazy Center

    First flown in late 1938, the Boeing 307 was the first airliner with a pressurized fuselage. It could carry 33 passengers in great comfort and cruise at 6,096 meters (20,000 feet), while maintaining a cabin pressure of 2,438 meters (8,000 feet). This enabled the Stratoliner to fly above most bad weather, thereby providing a faster and smoother ride.

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    Boeing 307 Stratoliner Panorama

    Panoramic view inside the Boeing 307 Stratoliner Clipper Flying Cloud.

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    Boeing 307 Stratoliner Cabin Panorama

    Panoramic view inside Boeing 307 Stratoliner Clipper Flying Cloud cabin.

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Display Status:

This object is on display in the Boeing Aviation Hangar at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, VA.

Boeing Aviation Hangar

First flown in late 1938, the Boeing 307 was the first airliner with a pressurized fuselage. It could carry 33 passengers in great comfort and cruise at 6,096 meters (20,000 feet), while maintaining a cabin pressure of 2,438 meters (8,000 feet). This enabled the Stratoliner to fly above most bad weather, thereby providing a faster and smoother ride.

The Stratoliner incorporated the wings, tail, and engines of the Boeing B-17C bomber. The wide fuselage was fitted with sleeper berths and reclining seats. Ten Stratoliners were built. The prototype was lost in an accident, but five were delivered to TWA and three were purchased by Pan American Airways. TWA owner Howard Hughes purchased a heavily modified version for his personal use. The airplane displayed here was flown by Pan American as the Clipper Flying Cloud. Boeing restored it in 2001.