Bowlus BA-100 Baby Albatross

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    Bowlus BA-100 Baby Albatross

    Single-seat, high-wing monoplane glider with wooden monocoque fuselage pod, aluminum tube tail boom, and wooden empennage; fabric-covered rudders and elevators and strut-braced wooden wings partially covered with fabric; hardware and fittings are cast aluminum.

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    Bowlus BA-100 Baby Albatross at the Udvar-Hazy Center

    The Baby Albatross, designed by William Bowlus, became one of the most successful kit-built sailplanes.
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    Bowlus BA-100 Baby Albatross

    Bowlus BA-100 Baby Albatross in 1994 (before restoration).
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    Bowlus BA-100 Baby Albatross

    Cockpit of the Bowlus BA-100 Baby Albatross
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    Bowlus BA-100 Baby Albatross Wing

    Bowlus BA-100 Baby Albatross Wing
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    Bowlus BA-100 Baby Albatross

    Inside the cockpit of the Bowlus BA-100 Baby Albatross 
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    Bowlus BA-100 Baby Albatross

    Bowlus BA-100 Baby Albatross rudder
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Display Status:

This object is on display in the Commercial Aviation at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, VA.

Commercial Aviation

William Hawley Bowlus offered the BA-100 Baby Albatross as a series of builders kits advertised in popular magazines to pilots interested in affordable flying at a time when the money for such activities was hard to come by. The kits cost one-fifth the $2,500 asking price of the higher performance Bowlus-du Pont Senior Albatross (see NASM collection). Bowlus made parts for about 90 aircraft and sold between 40 and 60 kits before the start of World War II ended the program.