Cessna 152 Aerobat

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    Cessna 152 Aerobat

    The Cessna 150 and 152 became the most popular civilian training aircraft after World War II, as well as economical recreational vehicles for weekend pilots. The A152 Aerobat appeals to those looking for a little more basic aerobatic and spin capability. This A152 belonged to William K. Kershner who bought it in 1984 for his ACE Aerobatic School in Sewanee, Tennessee.

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    Cessna 152 Aerobat Panorama

    Panoramic view inside the Cessna 152 Aerobat.

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This object is on display in the Boeing Aviation Hangar at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, VA.

Boeing Aviation Hangar

The Cessna 150 and 152 became the most popular civilian training aircraft after World War II, as well as economical recreational vehicles for weekend pilots. The series still serves as the principal two-seat, general aviation trainer in the United States. The A152 Aerobat, with greater structural strength to withstand up to +6g and -3g forces, appeals to those looking for a little more basic aerobatic and spin capability.

William K. Kershner bought this A152 in 1984 for his ACE Aerobatic School in Sewanee, Tennessee. A pilot for 61 years, Kershner flew more than 11,000 hours in military and civilian aircraft and performed over 7,000 spins for instruction and research purposes. He wrote five flying manuals, laced with technical wisdom and his trademark wit, that thousands of pilots worldwide have relied upon. In this airplane, 435 students completed his spin training course.