Computer, Guidance and Navigation, Apollo

    Usage Conditions Apply

    There are restrictions for re-using this media. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Computer, Guidance and Navigation, Apollo

    Rectangular box with waffled exterior with electrical connectors.

    1 of 2

    Usage Conditions Apply

    There are restrictions for re-using this media. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Computer, Guidance and Navigation, Apollo

    Rectangular box with waffled exterior with electrical connectors.

    2 of 2

Display Status:

This object is not on display at the National Air and Space Museum. It is either on loan or in storage.

The "Block I" Apollo Guidance Computer represented the initial design by the MIT Instrumentation Laboratory to meet NASA specifications for on-board Guidance, Navigation, and Control needed for a piloted mission to the Moon. It was replaced by a more advanced design, called "Block II," as the Apollo program matured. Block I computers were flown on three unmanned Apollo tests between August 1966 and April 1968.

This computer is an unflown, fully functional unit. It was built by the Raytheon Corporation, and used about 4,000 Integrated Circuits, supplied mainly by the Fairchild Semiconductor Corporation.

Transferred to the National Air and Space Museum from NASA in 1972.