Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor

    CCO - Creative Commons (CC0 1.0)

    This media is in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). You can copy, modify, and distribute this work without contacting the Smithsonian. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor

    Affectionately known as the “Tin Goose,” the Ford Tri-Motor was the largest civil aircraft in America when it first flew on August 2, 1926. Its all-metal, corrugated aluminum construction and the prestigious Ford name made it immediately popular with passengers and airline operators.

    1 of 40

    CCO - Creative Commons (CC0 1.0)

    This media is in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). You can copy, modify, and distribute this work without contacting the Smithsonian. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor

    Affectionately known as the “Tin Goose,” the Ford Tri-Motor was the largest civil aircraft in America when it first flew on August 2, 1926. Its all-metal, corrugated aluminum construction and the prestigious Ford name made it immediately popular with passengers and airline operators. Highlighted in this image are the fuselage and cockpit of the Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor.

    2 of 40

    CCO - Creative Commons (CC0 1.0)

    This media is in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). You can copy, modify, and distribute this work without contacting the Smithsonian. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor

    Affectionately known as the “Tin Goose,” the Ford Tri-Motor was the largest civil aircraft in America when it first flew on August 2, 1926. Its all-metal, corrugated aluminum construction and the prestigious Ford name made it immediately popular with passengers and airline operators. Highlighted in this image is the cockpit of the Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor.

    3 of 40

    CCO - Creative Commons (CC0 1.0)

    This media is in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). You can copy, modify, and distribute this work without contacting the Smithsonian. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor

    Affectionately known as the “Tin Goose,” the Ford Tri-Motor was the largest civil aircraft in America when it first flew on August 2, 1926. Its all-metal, corrugated aluminum construction and the prestigious Ford name made it immediately popular with passengers and airline operators. Highlighted in this image is the fuselage of the Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor.

    4 of 40

    CCO - Creative Commons (CC0 1.0)

    This media is in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). You can copy, modify, and distribute this work without contacting the Smithsonian. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor

    Affectionately known as the “Tin Goose,” the Ford Tri-Motor was the largest civil aircraft in America when it first flew on August 2, 1926. Its all-metal, corrugated aluminum construction and the prestigious Ford name made it immediately popular with passengers and airline operators.

    5 of 40

    CCO - Creative Commons (CC0 1.0)

    This media is in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). You can copy, modify, and distribute this work without contacting the Smithsonian. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor

    Affectionately known as the “Tin Goose,” the Ford Tri-Motor was the largest civil aircraft in America when it first flew on August 2, 1926. Its all-metal, corrugated aluminum construction and the prestigious Ford name made it immediately popular with passengers and airline operators.

    6 of 40

    CCO - Creative Commons (CC0 1.0)

    This media is in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). You can copy, modify, and distribute this work without contacting the Smithsonian. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor

    Affectionately known as the “Tin Goose,” the Ford Tri-Motor was the largest civil aircraft in America when it first flew on August 2, 1926. Its all-metal, corrugated aluminum construction and the prestigious Ford name made it immediately popular with passengers and airline operators.

    7 of 40

    CCO - Creative Commons (CC0 1.0)

    This media is in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). You can copy, modify, and distribute this work without contacting the Smithsonian. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor

    Air transport; Three engine; Monoplane.

    8 of 40

    CCO - Creative Commons (CC0 1.0)

    This media is in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). You can copy, modify, and distribute this work without contacting the Smithsonian. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor

    Air transport; Three engine; Monoplane.

    9 of 40

    CCO - Creative Commons (CC0 1.0)

    This media is in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). You can copy, modify, and distribute this work without contacting the Smithsonian. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

    IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

    View Manifest

    View in Mirador Viewer

    Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor

    Air transport; Three engine; Monoplane.

    10 of 40

    Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor

    This Ford Tri-motor is a 5-AT-B, NC9683, donated by American Airlines. 

    11 of 40

    Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor, America by Air

    A Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor on display in the National Mall building.

    12 of 40

    Close-Up Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor

    The Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor's all-metal, corrugated aluminum construction and the prestigious Ford name made it immediately popular with passengers and airline operators.

    13 of 40

    Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor American Airways Logo

     

    Affectionately known as the “Tin Goose,” the Ford Tri-Motor was the largest civil aircraft in America when it first flew on August 2, 1926. Its all-metal, corrugated aluminum construction and the prestigious Ford name made it immediately popular with passengers and airline operators. Highlighted in this image is the American Airways Logo the Ford Tri-Motor.

    14 of 40

    Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor Window

    Affectionately known as the “Tin Goose,” the Ford Tri-Motor was the largest civil aircraft in America when it first flew on August 2, 1926. Its all-metal, corrugated aluminum construction and the prestigious Ford name made it immediately popular with passengers and airline operators. Highlighted in this image is a window of the Ford Tri-Motor.

    15 of 40

    Ford Tri-Motor Rear View of Engine

    Affectionately known as the “Tin Goose,” the Ford Tri-Motor was the largest civil aircraft in America when it first flew on August 2, 1926. Its all-metal, corrugated aluminum construction and the prestigious Ford name made it immediately popular with passengers and airline operators. Highlighted in this image is the engine of the Ford Tri-Motor.

    16 of 40

    Ford Tri-Motor Propeller

    Affectionately known as the “Tin Goose,” the Ford Tri-Motor was the largest civil aircraft in America when it first flew on August 2, 1926. Its all-metal, corrugated aluminum construction and the prestigious Ford name made it immediately popular with passengers and airline operators. Highlighted in this image are the propeller and engine of the Ford Tri-Motor.

    17 of 40

    Ford Tri-Motor Pratt & Whitney Logo

    Affectionately known as the “Tin Goose,” the Ford Tri-Motor was the largest civil aircraft in America when it first flew on August 2, 1926. Its all-metal, corrugated aluminum construction and the prestigious Ford name made it immediately popular with passengers and airline operators. Highlighted in this image is the Pratt & Whitney logo on the engine of the Ford Tri-Motor.

    18 of 40

    Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor Hamilton Standard Logo

     

    Affectionately known as the “Tin Goose,” the Ford Tri-Motor was the largest civil aircraft in America when it first flew on August 2, 1926. Its all-metal, corrugated aluminum construction and the prestigious Ford name made it immediately popular with passengers and airline operators. Highlighted in this image is the Hamilton Standard Logo the Ford Tri-Motor.

    19 of 40

    Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor Interior Wing View

    Affectionately known as the “Tin Goose,” the Ford Tri-Motor was the largest civil aircraft in America when it first flew on August 2, 1926. Its all-metal, corrugated aluminum construction and the prestigious Ford name made it immediately popular with passengers and airline operators. Highlighted in this image is an interior view of a wing of the Ford Tri-Motor.

    20 of 40

    Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor Wing Interior

    Affectionately known as the “Tin Goose,” the Ford Tri-Motor was the largest civil aircraft in America when it first flew on August 2, 1926. Its all-metal, corrugated aluminum construction and the prestigious Ford name made it immediately popular with passengers and airline operators. Highlighted in this image is an interior view of a wing of the Ford Tri-Motor.

    21 of 40

    Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor Wing Light

    Affectionately known as the “Tin Goose,” the Ford Tri-Motor was the largest civil aircraft in America when it first flew on August 2, 1926. Its all-metal, corrugated aluminum construction and the prestigious Ford name made it immediately popular with passengers and airline operators. Highlighted in this image is a light on a wing of the Ford Tri-Motor.

    22 of 40

    Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor Wing Detail

    Affectionately known as the “Tin Goose,” the Ford Tri-Motor was the largest civil aircraft in America when it first flew on August 2, 1926. Its all-metal, corrugated aluminum construction and the prestigious Ford name made it immediately popular with passengers and airline operators. Highlighted in this image is a wing of the Ford Tri-Motor.

    23 of 40

    Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor Wing

    Affectionately known as the “Tin Goose,” the Ford Tri-Motor was the largest civil aircraft in America when it first flew on August 2, 1926. Its all-metal, corrugated aluminum construction and the prestigious Ford name made it immediately popular with passengers and airline operators. Highlighted in this image is a wing of the Ford Tri-Motor.

    24 of 40

    Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor Wing

     

    Affectionately known as the “Tin Goose,” the Ford Tri-Motor was the largest civil aircraft in America when it first flew on August 2, 1926. Its all-metal, corrugated aluminum construction and the prestigious Ford name made it immediately popular with passengers and airline operators. Highlighted in this image is a wing of the Ford Tri-Motor.

    25 of 40

    Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor Engine

    Affectionately known as the “Tin Goose,” the Ford Tri-Motor was the largest civil aircraft in America when it first flew on August 2, 1926. Its all-metal, corrugated aluminum construction and the prestigious Ford name made it immediately popular with passengers and airline operators. Highlighted in this image is the engine of the Ford Tri-Motor.

    26 of 40

    Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor Engine and Wheel

    Affectionately known as the “Tin Goose,” the Ford Tri-Motor was the largest civil aircraft in America when it first flew on August 2, 1926. Its all-metal, corrugated aluminum construction and the prestigious Ford name made it immediately popular with passengers and airline operators. Highlighted in this image are the engine and wheel of the Ford Tri-Motor.

    27 of 40

    Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor Engine

     

    Affectionately known as the “Tin Goose,” the Ford Tri-Motor was the largest civil aircraft in America when it first flew on August 2, 1926. Its all-metal, corrugated aluminum construction and the prestigious Ford name made it immediately popular with passengers and airline operators. Highlighted in this image of the engine of the Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor.

    28 of 40

    Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor Fuselage

     

    Affectionately known as the “Tin Goose,” the Ford Tri-Motor was the largest civil aircraft in America when it first flew on August 2, 1926. Its all-metal, corrugated aluminum construction and the prestigious Ford name made it immediately popular with passengers and airline operators. Highlighted in this image of the fuselage of the Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor.

    29 of 40

    Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor Vertical and Horizontal Stabilizers

    Affectionately known as the “Tin Goose,” the Ford Tri-Motor was the largest civil aircraft in America when it first flew on August 2, 1926. Its all-metal, corrugated aluminum construction and the prestigious Ford name made it immediately popular with passengers and airline operators. Highlighted in this image are the vertical and horizontal stabilizers of the Ford Tri-Motor.

    30 of 40

    Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor Cockpit and Instrument Panel

     

    Affectionately known as the “Tin Goose,” the Ford Tri-Motor was the largest civil aircraft in America when it first flew on August 2, 1926. Its all-metal, corrugated aluminum construction and the prestigious Ford name made it immediately popular with passengers and airline operators. Highlighted in this image is the cockpit of the Ford Tri-Motor.

    31 of 40

    Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor Cabin

     

    Affectionately known as the “Tin Goose,” the Ford Tri-Motor was the largest civil aircraft in America when it first flew on August 2, 1926. Its all-metal, corrugated aluminum construction and the prestigious Ford name made it immediately popular with passengers and airline operators. Highlighted in this image is the cabin of the Ford Tri-Motor.

    32 of 40

    Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor Cockpit

     

    Affectionately known as the “Tin Goose,” the Ford Tri-Motor was the largest civil aircraft in America when it first flew on August 2, 1926. Its all-metal, corrugated aluminum construction and the prestigious Ford name made it immediately popular with passengers and airline operators. Highlighted in this image is an interior view of the cockpit of the Ford Tri-Motor.

    33 of 40

    Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor Cabin

     

    Affectionately known as the “Tin Goose,” the Ford Tri-Motor was the largest civil aircraft in America when it first flew on August 2, 1926. Its all-metal, corrugated aluminum construction and the prestigious Ford name made it immediately popular with passengers and airline operators. Highlighted in this image is the cabin of the Ford Tri-Motor.

    34 of 40

    Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor Door

     

    Affectionately known as the “Tin Goose,” the Ford Tri-Motor was the largest civil aircraft in America when it first flew on August 2, 1926. Its all-metal, corrugated aluminum construction and the prestigious Ford name made it immediately popular with passengers and airline operators. Highlighted in this image is the exit door of the Ford Tri-Motor.

    35 of 40

    Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor Engine and Propellers

     

    Affectionately known as the “Tin Goose,” the Ford Tri-Motor was the largest civil aircraft in America when it first flew on August 2, 1926. Its all-metal, corrugated aluminum construction and the prestigious Ford name made it immediately popular with passengers and airline operators. Highlighted in this image are the engine and propellers of the Ford Tri-Motor.

    36 of 40

    Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor Propellers

     

    Affectionately known as the “Tin Goose,” the Ford Tri-Motor was the largest civil aircraft in America when it first flew on August 2, 1926. Its all-metal, corrugated aluminum construction and the prestigious Ford name made it immediately popular with passengers and airline operators. Highlighted in this image are the propellers of the Ford Tri-Motor.

    37 of 40

    Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor Rear Panorama

    Panoramic view inside the rear of the Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor.

    38 of 40

    Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor Panorama

    Panoramic view inside the cockpit of the Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor.

    39 of 40

    Ford’s Flying Machine

    40 of 40

Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor

Affectionately known as the “Tin Goose,” the Ford Tri-Motor was the largest civil aircraft in America when it first flew on August 2, 1926. Its all-metal, corrugated aluminum construction and the prestigious Ford name made it immediately popular with passengers and airline operators. Noisy but reliable, the Ford Tri-Motor played a major role in convincing the public that air travel was safe and practical.

The 5-AT, a more powerful version of the earlier 4-AT, had three Pratt & Whitney Wasp radial engines and entered service in 1928. The airplane on display above was restored by American Airlines.

Gift of American Airlines

Wingspan:23.7 m (77 ft 10 in)

Length:15.2 m (49 ft 10 in)

Height:4.2 m (13 ft 8 in)

Weight, gross:5,738 kg (12,650 lb)

Weight, empty:3,470 kg (7,650 lb)

Top speed:217 km/h (135 mph)

Engine:3 Pratt & Whitney Wasps, 420 hp

Manufacturer:Stout Metal Airplane Co. (a Division of Ford Motor Co.), 1928